Deno rust

Deno rust DEFAULT

How to create a Deno plugin in Rust

Deno is a new JavaScript runtime built with Rust and V8 that enables you to run JavaScript outside the browser. Deno is more secure than Node.js because it limits network and file system access by default.

One of the cool things about Deno is that you can write plugins in Rust and use them within Deno code. In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to create Deno plugins in Rust.

We’ll cover the following:

Why write Deno plugins in Rust?

Plugins in Deno generally improve performance and provide access to a wider range of tools.

Due to their performant nature, plugins are often used in calculations for heavy tasks such as image processing. Plugins also give you access to a variety of libraries written in other languages, including high-quality Rust crates.

Deno plugin project structure

The plugin project structure is the same as any Deno module. For the purpose of this tutorial, you can use this boilerplate:

git clone https://github.com/anshulrgoyal/deno-rust-starter.git my_module

First, build the Rust boilerplate for the plugin:

cd my_module/native cargo build

Next, run a test to verify that Deno is picking up the correct library:

cd my_module/native deno test --unstable --allow-plugin

The boilerplate includes a Rust project in the directory and a Deno module in the root.

Building a Rust project

The Rust project compiles a dynamic library that is loaded by the Deno runtime. The file type and name of the library depend on the operating system. The Rust project may compile to a file — or — and the name of the compiled file may also be different. The boilerplate can handle three major platforms: Linux, macOS, and Windows.

[package] name = "native" version = "0.1.0" authors = ["anshul <[email protected]>"] edition = "2018" [lib] name = "native" crate-type = ["cdylib"] [dependencies] deno_core = "0.75.0" ├── README.md ├── deps.ts ├── mod.ts ├── mod_test.ts ├── native │ ├── Cargo.lock │ ├── Cargo.toml │ ├── src │ └── lib.rs ├── test.ts ├── test_deps.ts └── tsconfig.json

The file is the main file imported by another application using your module.

Adding Rust code

For this tutorial, we’ll show you how to build a PNG optimizer using an crate. Every Deno plugin must export the function and register all the methods that the plugin exports.

The attribute tells the compiler not to change the name of the function:

#[no_mangle] pub fn deno_plugin_init(interface: &mut dyn Interface) { // register the function. Pass name and function to register method interface.register_op("hello_world",hello_world); }

Creating the optimizer function

Each exported function has the same signature. Deno plugins can only export functions. These functions can be sync or async, depending on the return type.

fn optimise(_interface: &mut dyn Interface, zero_copy: &mut [ZeroCopyBuf], ) -> Op { // get first argument let first=zero_copy.first().unwrap(); let opts: oxipng::Options = Default::default(); // convert vector let result = oxipng::optimize_from_memory(&first.to_vec(), &opts).unwrap(); // move to heap so that deno can use it Op::Sync(Box::from(result)) }

The second argument of the function contains an array of buffers. Each buffer in the array represents the argument passed to the exported function when called. These buffers are serialized to strings or other data types based on requirements.

The above code takes the first element of and passes it to . The first element of the array is the file passed to the function when called from the Deno code. The file is passed as bytes. The function processes the file and returns the result as a . The return type is enum with two variants and .

Build the code using the command. Now this plugin can be used in Deno.

Loading a Rust plugin in Deno

Now that the plugin is compiled, let’s load it using Deno.

The plugin is still in development and is a part of unstable APIs, so the flag is required, as is .

let path = "" // check the type of OS to load correct file if (Deno.build.os === "linux") { // linux file emited by rust compiler path = "./native/target/debug/libnative.so" } else if (Deno.build.os === "windows") { // windows file emited by rust compiler path = "./native/target/debug/native.dll" } else if (Deno.build.os === "darwin") { // macos file emited by rust comipler path = "./native/target/debug/libnative.dylib" } // load plugin from file system const rid = Deno.openPlugin(path); // Get available methods on plugin //@ts-Expect-Error const { optimise:optimise_native } = (Deno as any).core.ops(); export async function optimise(fileName: string): Promise<Uint8Array> { // reading a file const file = await Deno.open(fileName); // getting content const value = await Deno.readAll(file) // closing file await Deno.close(file.rid) // running the native plugin method using Deno dispatch method return (Deno as any).core.dispatch(optimise_native, value) }

Each plugin is loaded using the method. Then, the method is used to get the method identifier, which executes the code exported by the plugin.

is used to run code exported by the native plugin. The first argument is the method identifier; the rest are passed for the native function. In this case, the file is passed.

Writing async plugins

Since Deno is single-threaded, it’s not wise to block the main thread. Deno allows you to return a future from the native function, which you can use with OS threads to write a function that doesn’t block the main thread.

fn optimise_async(_interface: &mut dyn Interface, zero_copy: &mut [ZeroCopyBuf], ) -> Op { // get first argument let first=zero_copy.first().unwrap(); let opts: oxipng::Options = Default::default(); let arg=first.to_vec(); // create a new future let fut = async move { // create a channel to send result once done to main thread let (tx, rx) = futures::channel::oneshot::channel::<oxipng::PngResult<Vec<u8>>>(); // create a new thread std::thread::spawn(move || { // perform work let result = oxipng::optimize_from_memory(&arg, &opts); // send result to main thread tx.send(result).unwrap(); }); // receive the result let result=rx.await; // create a boxed slice let result_box = result.unwrap().unwrap().into_boxed_slice(); // return boxed slice from the future result_box }; // return the future Op::Async(fut.boxed()) }

A future is created using the block and returned as a boxed future. Deno handles the completion of the future and informs the Deno side of the plugin. A channel is used to communicate between the new thread and the main thread.

The Deno code doesn’t need much updating — just a new to handle the completion of the task:

let path = "" if (Deno.build.os === "linux") { path = "./native/target/debug/libnative.so" } else if (Deno.build.os === "windows") { path = "./native/target/debug/native.dll" } else if (Deno.build.os === "darwin") { path = "./native/target/debug/libnative.dylib" } const rid = Deno.openPlugin(path); const { optimise_async } = (Deno as any).core.ops(); export async function optimise(fileName: string){ const file = await Deno.open(fileName); const value = await Deno.readAll(file); await Deno.close(file.rid); // new handler (Deno as any).core.setAsyncHandler(optimise_async, (response:any) => { Deno.writeFile("l.png",response) }); // executing the native code. (Deno as any).core.dispatch(optimise_async,value); } await optimise("t.png") await Deno.close(rid);

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we covered how to build a simple Deno plugin using Rust as well as how to create an async plugin using Rust futures and the crate.

Rust has a large ecosystem with high-quality crates. You can use all these crates in Deno by creating plugins. Whether it’s an image processing plugin, database connector, etc., access to Rust plugins helps to expand the Deno ecosystem.

LogRocket: Full visibility into production Rust apps

Debugging Rust applications can be difficult, especially when users experience issues that are difficult to reproduce. If you’re interested in monitoring and tracking performance of your Rust apps, automatically surfacing errors, and tracking slow network requests and load time, try LogRocket. LogRocket Dashboard Free Trial Banner

LogRocket is like a DVR for web apps, recording literally everything that happens on your Rust app. Instead of guessing why problems happen, you can aggregate and report on what state your application was in when an issue occurred. LogRocket also monitors your app’s performance, reporting metrics like client CPU load, client memory usage, and more.

Modernize how you debug your Rust apps — start monitoring for free.

Sours: https://blog.logrocket.com/how-to-create-a-deno-plugin-in-rust/

Deno (software)

Version Latest patch release Release date Date of last patch release Description Old version, no longer maintained: 0.1.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.1.12 2018-08-23 2018-11-12 Rust rewrite and V8 snapshot Old version, no longer maintained: 0.2.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.2.11 2018-11-27 2019-02-08 Mildly usable Old version, no longer maintained: 0.3.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.3.10 2019-02-18 2019-04-25 Instead of importing a "deno" module, there is now a global variable called "Deno" Old version, no longer maintained: 0.4.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.4.0 2019-05-03 2019-05-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.5.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.5.0 2019-05-11 2019-05-11 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.6.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.6.0 2019-05-20 2019-05-20 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.7.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.7.0 2019-05-29 2019-05-29 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.8.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.8.0 2019-06-08 2019-06-08 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.9.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.9.0 2019-06-15 2019-06-15 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.10.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.10.0 2019-06-25 2019-06-25 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.11.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.11.0 2019-07-06 2019-07-06 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.12.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.12.0 2019-07-16 2019-07-16 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.13.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.13.0 2019-07-31 2019-07-31 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.14.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.14.0 2019-08-09 2019-08-09 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.15.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.15.0 2019-08-13 2019-08-13 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.16.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.16.0 2019-08-22 2019-08-22 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.17.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.17.0 2019-09-04 2019-09-04 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.18.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.18.0 2019-09-13 2019-09-13 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.19.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.19.0 2019-09-24 2019-09-24 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.20.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.20.0 2019-10-06 2019-10-06 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.21.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.21.0 2019-10-19 2019-10-19 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.22.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.22.0 2019-10-28 2019-10-28 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.23.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.23.0 2019-11-04 2019-11-04 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.24.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.24.0 2019-11-14 2019-11-14 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.25.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.25.0 2019-11-26 2019-11-26 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.26.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.26.0 2019-12-05 2019-12-05 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.27.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.27.0 2019-12-18 2019-12-18 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.28.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.28.1 2020-01-02 2020-01-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.29.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.29.0 2020-01-09 2020-01-09 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.30.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.30.0 2020-01-17 2020-01-17 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.31.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.31.0 2020-01-24 2020-01-24 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.32.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.32.0 2020-02-03 2020-02-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.33.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.33.0 2020-02-13 2020-02-13 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.34.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.34.0 2020-02-20 2020-02-20 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.35.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.35.0 2020-02-28 2020-02-28 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.36.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.36.0 2020-03-11 2020-03-11 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.37.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.37.1 2020-03-23 2020-03-23 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.38.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.38.0 2020-03-28 2020-03-28 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.39.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.39.0 2020-04-03 2020-04-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.40.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.40.0 2020-04-08 2020-04-08 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.41.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.41.0 2020-04-16 2020-04-16 - Old version, no longer maintained: 0.42.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 0.42.0 2020-04-29 2020-04-29 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.0.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.0.5 2020-05-13 2020-06-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.1.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.1.3 2020-06-12 2020-07-03 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.2.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.2.3 2020-07-13 2020-08-08 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.3.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.3.3 2020-08-13 2020-09-04 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.4.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.4.6 2020-09-13 2020-10-10 - Old version, no longer maintained: 1.5.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.5.4 2020-10-27 2020-11-23 Faster tree-shaking and bundling, refactored REPL Old version, no longer maintained: 1.6.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.6.3 2020-12-08 2020-12-30 Compile standalone binaries via "deno compile", support TypeScript 4.1, experimental support for Mac ARM64 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.7.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.7.5 2021-02-05 2021-02-19 Cross compilation and 60% smaller binaries for deno compile, a DNS resolver API, support for data URLs in import statements and web workers Old version, no longer maintained: 1.8.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.8.3 2021-03-02 2021-04-02 Experimental support for WebGPU API, built-in internationalization APIs enabled, support for fetching private modules, revamped coverage tooling, support for TypeScript 4.2 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.9.0 Old version, no longer maintained: 1.9.2 2021-04-13 2021-04-23 Native HTTP/2 web server, Faster calls into Rust with serde_v8, Blob URL support & improvements to fetch api, Import completions in the LSP, Interactive permission prompt Current stable version:1.10.0Current stable version:1.10.22021-05-11 2021-05-17 Improvements to the built in test runner, structured clone support in Web Workers, Web Storage API, support for remote import maps

Legend:

Old version

Older version, still maintained

Latest version

Latest preview version

Future release

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deno_(software)
  1. Tabletop mp3 player
  2. Hollywood hotels tripadvisor
  3. Crash bandicoot discord
  4. Jackson zoo
  5. Psr yamaha keyboard

How does Deno Use Rust

astorm

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Programming Quickies

Quick dispatches from the life of a working programmer.

Reddit is not my natural enviornment, but I occasionally hover around its various programming communities. This is a personal archive of an answer to a question about the Deno, the new “run javascript on your own computer” project.


I’m far from an expert in all the real details here, but I’ll give this a go.

Deno has not re-implemented the V8 engine in rust. Deno still uses the C++ code for the V8 javascript engine. A javascript engine in an important part of a system like deno or node, but it’s not the only part of a system like deno or node.

For example — as a javascript programmer, you may think of as a part of javascript — but the code that schedules and manages all the different bits of javascript that you’ve asked to run is not part of V8.

Another example — if you want your javascript program to open a file, the underlying code that open a file is not a part of V8.

Details on how node itself is built aren’t as abundant as details on how to use node — but this learning-nodejs repo has a decent introduction, and there’s lots of good details in this How Node.js Bootstraps Itself: 2019 Edition talk from Node Interactive 2019. The short version: In addition to V8 Engine — node itself gets a lot of its functionality from a plain C library called libuv, and a lot of C++ glue code maintained by the NodeJS project itself.

Deno’s manual has an architecture section, including a diagram at the bottom. Again, I’m far from an expert here, but based on this document it seems like the deno executable is a rust program. There’s something called that’s implemented in C++ (although I don’t see any C++ files in the repository, so I’m unsure what this is). Deno also uses the tokio project, which is (roughly) a rust equivalent to libuv. It also looks like the code for “io” (file reading/writing, printing things, etc), TCP Networking, and managing child processes is implemented via rust.

So your question, What Rust has to do with Deno?, is a good one, but it’s also a pretty broad one, and hard to answer succinctly (especially since I’m not a rust programmer) — but I hope this at least helps you get pointed in the right direction.

Sours: https://alanstorm.com
Isan Rivkin - Boost Deno with Rust (Hebrew)

Deno

Build Status - CirrusTwitter handleDiscord Chat

the deno mascot dinosaur standing in the rain

Deno is a simple, modern and secure runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript that uses V8 and is built in Rust.

Features

  • Secure by default. No file, network, or environment access, unless explicitly enabled.
  • Supports TypeScript out of the box.
  • Ships only a single executable file.
  • Built-in utilities like a dependency inspector (deno info) and a code formatter (deno fmt).
  • Set of reviewed standard modules that are guaranteed to work with Deno.

Install

Shell (Mac, Linux):

curl -fsSL https://deno.land/x/install/install.sh | sh

PowerShell (Windows):

iwr https://deno.land/x/install/install.ps1 -useb | iex

Homebrew (Mac):

Chocolatey (Windows):

Scoop (Windows):

Build and install from source using Cargo:

cargo install deno --locked

See deno_install and releases for other options.

Getting Started

Try running a simple program:

deno run https://deno.land/std/examples/welcome.ts

Or a more complex one:

constlistener=Deno.listen({port: 8000});console.log("http://localhost:8000/");forawait(constconnoflistener){serve(conn);}asyncfunctionserve(conn: Deno.Conn){forawait(const{ respondWith }ofDeno.serveHttp(conn)){respondWith(newResponse("Hello world"));}}

You can find a deeper introduction, examples, and environment setup guides in the manual.

The complete API reference is available at the runtime documentation.

Contributing

We appreciate your help!

To contribute, please read our contributing instructions.

Sours: https://github.com/denoland/deno

Rust deno

By Michael yuan
Link to the original text:https://www.infoq.com/article…

How to access rust function in DeNO typescript application?

How to call Rust function in Deno application

main points:

  • DeNO and Node.js All of them execute JavaScript on C / C + + based Runtime to achieve high performance.
  • DeNO is a single binary application that is not compatible with NPM modules, and there is no simple way to incorporate native modules into an application.
  • Webassembly provides a way to run high-performance code in DeNO applications.
  • Webassembly is a safe, light and lightweight container for server applications.
  • Rust compiler tool chain provides powerful support for webassembly.

The much anticipated DeNO project recently released version 1.0. DeNO by Node.js One of the founders of the project, Ryan Dahl, launched the project to solve what he called “I do it for you.” Node.js Ten things to regret.

DeNO doesn’t use NPM and the infamous. DeNO is a single binary executable that runs applications written in typescript and JavaScript.

However, although typescript and JavaScript are suitable for most web applications, they can not meet the computing intensive tasks, such as neural network training and reasoning, machine learning and cryptography. actually, Node.js It is often necessary to use a local library to perform these tasks (for example, using OpenSSL for encryption).

If there is no NPM like system to merge native modules, how can we write server-side applications that need native performance on DeNO? Webassembly will help! In this article, we use rust to write high-performance functions, compile rust functions into webassemblies, and then run them in DeNO applications.

TL;DR

Clone or fork on GitHubDeNO starter template. Follow the instructions below to run the webassembly function (written by rust) in DeNO in just five minutes.

background knowledge

Node.js It is very successful because it brings developers the best of both worlds: the ease of use of JavaScript (especially event based asynchronous applications) and the high performance of C / C + +. Node.js The application is written in JavaScript, but executed in a native runtime based on C / C + +, such as the Google V8 JavaScript engine and many native library modules. DeNO wants to replicate this formula to succeed, but the difference is that DeNO supports the modern technology stack with typescript and rust.

DeNO is written in rust, a simple, modern and secure runtime based on V8 JavaScript and typescript. – deno.land Website.

stayI’m right Node.js Ten things to regret》In this famous speech, Node.js Ryan Dahl, founder of DeNO, explains why we started DeNO and saw it as a Node.js Competitors and even substitutes. Dahl’s regrets focus on Node.js How to manage third party code and modules on.

  • Used to connect the C module to the Node.js The complex construction system.
  • ,,And other NPM artifacts are very complex, but it’s not necessary.

Therefore, DeNO makes some conscious and conscious choices when managing dependencies.

  • DeNO is a single binary executable.
  • The application is written in typescript or JavaScript, and the dependencies are explicitly declared asStatement with a full URL to connect to the source code of the dependency.
  • DeNO and Node.js Module is not compatible.

That’s ok. But what should applications that need higher performance do? In particular, how to deal with AI as a service applications that need to execute complex neural network models in a few seconds? In DeNO and Node.js In, many functions are called through typescript or JavaScript API, but these functions are executed in native code written in rust or C language. In Node.js You can always choose to call a third-party local library from a JavaScript API. But can’t we do this in DeNO right now?

Webassembly support in DeNO

Webassembly is a lightweight virtual machine designed to execute portable bytecode at near native speed. You can compile rust or C + + functions into webassembly bytecode and access them from typescript. For some tasks, this approach is much faster than the equivalent function written in typescript. For example, research published by IBM has found that using rust and webassembly in some data processing algorithms can make the Node.js The execution speed of is increased by 1200% to 1500%.

DeNO uses Google V8 engine internally. V8 is not only a JavaScript runtime, but also a webassembly virtual machine. DeNO supports webassembly out of the box. DeNO provides an API for typescript applications to call functions in webassembly.

In fact, some popular DeNO components have been implemented in webassembly. For example, use emscripten to compile the C source code of SQLite into webassembly to create the C source code in DeNOSQLite module。 DeNO Wasi componentsEnables web assembly applications to access underlying operating system resources, such as the file system. This article will show you how to write high-performance DeNO applications in rust and webassembly.

set up

The first step, of course, is installationDenoIn most operating systems, only one command is required

Since we need to use rust to write functions, we also need to install the compiler and tools of rust

last,ssvmupThe tool automates the build process and generates all artifacts, making it easy for DeNO applications to call the rust function. Again, you need to install the ssvmup dependency.

Note: use ssvmupGlue code is automatically generated between JavaScript and rust source code so that JavaScript and rust can communicate using their own native data types. Without ssvmup, function parameters and return values will be limited to simple types (i.e., 32-bit integers) that are locally supported by webassembly. For example, without ssvmup and, string or array cannot be used.

Hello world

First, let’s take a look at DeNO’shello worldExample, get the Hello World source code and application template from GitHub.

The rust function is located in thesrc/lib.rsFile, just add “hello” before the input string. be careful,Function usageAnnotated so that ssvmup can generate the necessary “pipes.”. Based on this, we can call the rust function from typescript.

The DeNO application is located indeno / server.tsFile. The application starts from PKG / functions_ lib.js How to import files into rustFunction, which is generated by the ssvmup tool.The file name depends onCargo.tomlThe name of the rust project defined in the file.

Now, run ssvmup to build the rust function into a DeNO webassembly function.

After ssvmup completes successfully, you can check theTo learn how to use the DeNO webassembly API to execute compiled webassembly files。

Next, run the DeNO application. DeNO needs permission to read the file system because it needs to load the webassembly file. At the same time, DeNO also needs to access the network, because it needs to receive and respond to HTTP requests.

Now, in another terminal window, you can access the DeNO web application and connect to say hello through HTTP!

A complex example

This introductory template project includes many detailed examples of how to transfer complex data between DeNO typescript and rust functions. This issrc/lib.rsOther rust functions in. Please note that they are all usednotes.

Perhaps the most interesting thing is thatFunction. This function requires two JSON strings. Each string represents aStructure and returns a representationStructure. be careful,andAll structures are usedandComments are made forThe compiler automatically generates the necessary code to support their interaction with theConversion between strings.

Next, let’s examine the JavaScript programdeno/test.ts, which shows how to call the rust function.andIs a simple string in JavaScript,It’s numbers, not numbersorIt’s JavaScript. JavaScript objects need to pass throughorTo pass in or return from the rust function.

After running ssvmup to build the rust library, run DeNO in DeNO runtime/ test.ts The following outputs are generated:

What’s next?

Now we can create the rust function and access it from the DeNO typescript application. Next, we can use the rust function to write compute intensive tasks, and provide high-performance and secure web services through DeNO. Examples of such services includemachine learningandimage recognition。

Sours: https://developpaper.com/how-to-call-rust-function-in-deno-application/
Deno Deploy Has The Potential To Be The Next Big Thing

A modern runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript.

Installv1.15.1

Deno is a simple, modern and secure runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript that uses V8 and is built in Rust.

  1. Secure by default. No file, network, or environment access, unless explicitly enabled.
  2. Supports TypeScript out of the box.
  3. Ships only a single executable file.
  4. Has built-in utilities like a dependency inspector () and a code formatter ().
  5. Has a set of reviewed (audited) standard modules that are guaranteed to work with Deno: deno.land/std
  6. Has a number of companies interested in using and exploring Deno

Installation

Deno ships as a single executable with no dependencies. You can install it using the installers below, or download a release binary from the releases page.

Shell (Mac, Linux):

PowerShell (Windows):

Homebrew (Mac):

Chocolatey (Windows):

Scoop (Windows):

Build and install from source using Cargo:

See deno_install for more installation options.

Getting Started

Try running a simple program:

Or a more complex one:

You can find a more in depth introduction, examples, and environment setup guides in the manual.

Runtime Documentation

The basic runtime documentation for Deno can be found on doc.deno.land.

Deno comes with a manual which contains more in depth explanations about the more complex functions of the runtime, an introduction to the concepts that Deno is built on, details about the internals of Deno, how to embed Deno in your own application and how to extend Deno using Rust plugins.

The manual also contains information about the built in tools that Deno provides.

Standard Modules

Next to the Deno runtime, Deno also provides a list of audited standard modules that are reviewed by the Deno maintainers and are guaranteed to work with a specific Deno version. These live in the denoland/deno_std repository.

These standard modules are hosted at deno.land/std and are distributed via URLs like all other ES modules that are compatible with Deno.

Third Party Modules

Deno can import modules from any location on the web, like GitHub, a personal webserver, or a CDN like Skypack, jspm.io, jsDelivr or esm.sh.

To make it easier to consume third party modules Deno provides some built in tooling like and . deno.land also provides a web UI for viewing module documentation. It is available at doc.deno.land.

deno.land also provides a simple public hosting service for ES modules that work with Deno. It can be found at deno.land/x.

Sours: https://deno.land/

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How to Compile Rust into WebAssembly and Run it in Deno

This tutorial takes you through all you need to know to compile a Rust project to WebAssembly and then run it in Deno.

Why Rust? Web applications struggle to attain and retain reliable performance. JavaScript’s dynamic type system and garbage collection pauses don’t help. Seemingly small code changes can result in drastic performance regressions if you accidentally wander off the JIT’s (Just In Time Compiler) happy path.

Rust gives programmers low-level control and reliable performance. It is free from the non-deterministic garbage collection pauses that plague JavaScript. Programmers have control over indirection, monomorphization and memory layout.

Here’s the content we’ll cover, from installing the necessary tools to compile Rust code and the tools to compile it into the WebAssembly format, to finally loading and using the library in Deno. Before we go any further, the following need to be installed on your machine for working with Rust and Deno.

  • rustc: This is the compiler for the Rust programming language, provided by the project itself. Compilers take your source code and produce binary code, either as a library or executable.
  • rustup: This installs the Rust programming language from the official release channels, enabling you to easily switch between stable, beta and nightly compilers and keep them updated.
  • cargo: This is the Rust package manager. Cargo downloads your Rust package’s dependencies, compiles your packages, makes distributable packages and uploads them to crates.io, the Rust community’s package registry.
  • deno: This is a JavaScript/TypeScript runtime with secure defaults and a great developer experience.

Set up WebAssembly for Rust

Now, we need to install the following WebAssembly tools for Rust.

  • wasm32-unknown-unknown: The target represents a WebAssembly output that makes zero assumptions about its environment, hence the . The target is intended to encapsulate use cases that do not rely on any imported functionality. The binaries generated are entirely self-contained by default when using the standard library.
  • wasm-gc: A small tool to garbage collect a WebAssembly module and remove all unneeded exports, imports, functions, etc.

Note: If you are using Visual Studio Code for development, install the following extensions.

  • Better Toml
  • Rust

Create a Cargo Lib

First, we need to open Visual Studio Code in our workspace. Next, we need to create a small cargo lib. Open the terminal and run the following command:

Next, open the file and add the dependencies for wasm.

Note: makes our project usable with other languages like C or in our case . It also removes all the specific stuff that is needed for rust.

Create a Rust Function

Paste the following code in the file.

This is a simple function that takes in the current year and your year of birth and returns your age.

Note: We added the keyword so that this function can be imported into our Deno code.

Compiling the Rust to WebAssembly

Now, we are ready to compile our rust code to wasm code. Run the following code to build it.

Next using the , we need to remove all unneeded exports, imports, functions, etc.

Now, we have a binary ready to be loaded into Deno and executed.

Load and Execute Binary with Deno

Create a file.

Add the following code to the file.

The above code loads the raw file. Then it makes a wasm module out of our file so that we can work with it. Next, it creates an instance of our module so that we can use the functions after which we imported our function into our Deno code.

To execute the code run the following.

Conclusion

And that’s it! You just wrote Rust code, compiled it to WebAssembly, loaded the WASM file into Deno and used the functions.


deno, JavaScript, rust, Tutorial, webassembly

Sours: https://www.telerik.com/blogs/how-to-compile-rust-into-webassembly-run-in-deno


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