Restored matchbox cars

Restored matchbox cars DEFAULT

The toy cars scene these days is quite similar to the real automotive world. A number of manufacturers dominate the new cars market, but there’s also a growing community of enthusiasts who cherish vintage models from famous makers. Refurbishing is a big thing among fans, and there’s even a dedicated YouTube channel detailing dozens of restoration projects with Hot Wheels and Matchbox cars.

Going by the name of baremetalHW, the channel offers hundreds of videos with all kinds of toy cars from the past and their full restoration. Last summer, we showed you the impossible restoration of a Hot Wheels 1968 Custom Camaro, and today we bring you an even more challenging project. The video at the top details the full refurbish of an extremely broken Hot Wheels 1971 Bye-Focal.

The car’s seen better times, to say the least. Someone must’ve stepped on it as all its plastic windows, including the plastic engine cover, are shattered. The pink-purple color is not its original shade, but no one can really say what the factory color was. The suspension is worn out and the tires aren’t sitting in the correct position.

The restoration process starts with a gentle re-forming of the roof with a ball-peen hammer, followed by a complete removal of the paint. The latter may sound like an easy job, but the cleaning of the engine compartment seems to be a time-consuming and tedious process. Then, the work continues with a galvanization and a full-body deep polish before five layers of paint are applied.

Hot Wheels 1971 Bye-Focal restorationHot Wheels 1971 Bye-Focal restoration

Thankfully, there are online shops that offer reproduction parts for Hot Wheels restoration projects, because original parts are no longer available. One such seller provided the plastic windows and engine cover for this car.

Watching this old Hot Wheels model return to its former glory is satisfying nearly as much as seeing a classic vehicle being fully restored. The attention to details is amazing and we bet the whole process is quite rewarding. Enjoy watching the video.

Source: baremetalHW on YouTube

3Photos

Sours: https://www.motor1.com/news/268833/hot-wheels-car-restoration-video/

How to Restore Matchbox Cars

A Matchbox car can take a beating after years of play and storage in (often) dingy attics and basements. If you like to clean up those cars, or even display them, a restoration project will be worth your time. All you need are the proper supplies. You may not be able to perfectly replicate the original, but it's possible to make the cars look like new again.

Drill out the rivets to disassemble the vehicle. Once they are removed, the car will come apart easily.

  • A Matchbox car can take a beating after years of play and storage in (often) dingy attics and basements.
  • Once they are removed, the car will come apart easily.

Soak the car in paint stripper until all the paint is removed. Only the metal frame of the car should remain.

Coat the car with standard primer. Let it dry, then spray the car with spray paint. The colour should be as close a match to the original as possible.

Add any details (such as racing stripes or other detail work) with acrylic paints.

Add a coat of clear gloss to protect the paint job. This is available in both a spray version and a version that can be applied by paintbrush. The spray variety works well since you can cover the entire car without worrying about small, individual sections.

  • Coat the car with standard primer.
  • The spray variety works well since you can cover the entire car without worrying about small, individual sections.

Replace the axels if necessary using 1 ½ inch pins. Cut them down to the appropriate size and stick the wheels back on.

Reassemble the car and dab some glue into the rivets.

As an alternative, use masking tape to cover the areas you don’t want painted with masking tape and spray paint the car in the different colour. But the masking tape doesn’t always give a good solid edge. You can also use a sharpie to add finer details. Add decals if necessary. Wet slide decals, which are intended for model trains, also work well for Matchbox cars. They can be found at most hobby shops.

Sours: https://www.ehow.co.uk/how_6904708_restore-matchbox-cars.html
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This is an MGA number 19b that I have restored. There is nothing rare about this model, it's just a little cutie that I love!

The wheels have been replaced with reproduction ones and the axle ends have been filed as you can see in the photo.

The driver is original but taken from a number 18 Austin Taxi Cab.

I have re-attached the base plate using rivets. It looks very neat and doesn't detract from the model in any way, but certainly identifies it as a restored or modified model.

This, in my opinion is a responsible approach to restoring and rebuilding vintage toy cars.

This number 25 Bedford BP Tanker is the rare grey wheeled version which sells for about US$1500.

A normal black wheeled version fetches around US$50 for a perfect example. Other than the wheels, there is no difference.

This is a prime model for conmen to have a go at. The model to the left looks to be in near perfect condition, but, on close inspection it is easy to spot as a fake.

This is one that could easily pass normal scrutiny and be sold as genuine.

In this case, the faker has taken a nice run of the mill black wheeled version and swapped the wheels.

By studying the axle ends, it is easy to see they have been filed to allow the wheels to slide off and on easily. They have then been repreened in a fashion.

The main giveaway in this case is the larger head on the axles. In the top picture, two are fed through from the left hand side with the middle axle being threaded from the right hand side.

This is a possible sign of tampering.

In the factory, as a rule, the axles are threaded through from the same side. The other give away is the laziness of the faker. If you are going to fake a model, at least clean the wheels! A mint model with dirty wheels is a bit of a give away.

There are always some little signs that give the game away.

Replacement decals is another sign to look out for. A lot of purist collectors despise reproduction parts, yet it is important to know what the parts look like so we can tell if they have been used on a model.

I for one think it's great that there are dedicated people making reproduction parts so many old models can be resurrected. This does not just apply to Matchbox. There are lots of Dinky, Corgi and other model car brand restorers in the collecting fraternity.

This is a number 10c Sugar Container Truck. It has been nicely restored with replacement decals applied.

Although the decals look fine on the model, when compared to a genuine unrestored model, it is easy to see the differences in the decals.

This is what I mean by saying it's important to know what the parts look like, so you can tell them apart from the genuine items.

Below, we have a genuine original model. Can you spot the differences in the decals?

First of all, lets look at the "Crown".

On the original model, the "Crown is quite finely printed. This is not so on the reproduction version.

Next look at the wording. Again, on the original version it comes out a lot finer than on the reproduction version.

Thirdly, compare the colours of the two. The original one is quite vibrant where the reproduction version appears washed out.

Also, with age the original decal has darkened, where the reproduction decal "blends in" with the paint.

Although this is not a valuable model and certainly not worth restoring to rip off a collector, it is however a good example to show what to look for.

Here is a close up of the back wheels and axles. Notice how the axles have been ground away so the wheels can be taken off to paint the model.

Also, the front of the two wheels has not been mounted on the axle correctly so it appears as though it's half off. Another tell tale sign! Look how dirty the wheels are compared to the rest of the model.

Be vigilant and don't be fooled! I do not want to see any of my readers taken to the cleaners through lack of education on these issues. There have been some very serious collectors taken for tens of thousands of dollars due to fakes and fraudsters. If we are aware of what to look for, we will not be the fraudsters next victim!

Sours: https://www.mokolesneymatchbox.com/fakes-frauds/f-f-restorations.html
MATCHBOX Restoration No 32b E Type Jaguar 1962

Did you have anything planned for the next hour or so? No? That’s good because if you’re anything like us, watching even one of the restorations performed on [Marty’s Matchbox Makeovers] is likely to send you down a deep dark rabbit hole that you never knew existed. Even if you can’t tell the difference between Hot Wheels and Matchbox (seriously, that’s a big deal in the community), there’s something absolutely fascinating about seeing all the little tips and tricks used to bring these decades-old toy cars back into like new condition.

You might think that all it takes to restore a Matchbox car is striping the paint off, buffing up the windows, and respraying the thing; and indeed you wouldn’t be too far off the mark in some cases. But you’ve got to remember that these little cars have often been through decades of some of the worst operating conditions imaginable. That is, being the plaything of a human child. While some of the cars that [Marty] rebuilds are in fairly good condition to begin with, many of them look like they’ve just come back from a miniature demolition derby.

The ones which have had the hardest lives are invariably the most interesting. Some of the fixes, like heating up the interior and manually bending the steering wheel back into shape, are fairly simple. But what do you do when a big chunk of the vehicle is simply gone? In those cases, [Marty] will combine cyanoacrylate “super glue” with baking powder to fill in voids; and after filing, sanding, and painting, you’d never know it was ever damaged.

When a car needs more than just paint to finish it off, [Marty] will research the original toy and make new water slide decals to match what it would have looked like originally. If it’s missing accessories, such as the case with trucks which were meant to carry scale cargo, he’ll take careful measurements so he can design and print new parts. With some sanding and a touch of paint, you’d never know they weren’t original.

There’s plenty of arcane knowledge to be gained from folks like [Marty] who have experience with scale models. We don’t often see much of that come our way, but when we do, we’re always impressed at the lengths individuals will go to get that perfect end result. Whether or not you think you’ll find yourself rebuilding a pocket-sized school bus anytime soon, we think there are lessons to be learned from those who might.

Sours: https://hackaday.com/2019/03/10/the-fine-art-of-restoring-matchbox-cars/

Cars restored matchbox

Pot Metal Welding: Matchbox Car Restoration 36a Austin A50 1957

Pot metal welding is an easy task with Super Alloy 1.  In this video, Matchbox car restoration tips using Muggy Weld Super Alloy 1 pot metal solder and flux, featured on Marty’s Makeover Magic.

Marty begins his restoration by using a dental tool and follows with a Dremel tool to preclean the Matchbox car parent metal prior to welding.

Partial transcription from the video:

I was going to do 2 Matchbox car restorations in one, but this little toy put up so much resistance that I ran out of time. So this Matchbox car restoration is just the one off, this is an old school Marty’s Matchbox Makeover of yesteryear when I first started off and I would do these old vintage cars with no gimmicks and basic techniques. Because these are the kind of Matchbox car models that I first started out, it’s great to revisit them because they are sadly neglected and often forgotten, as they were the genuine Matchbox originals.

The pot metal bumper bar needs dressing with a file. I did rub it over with some bronze wool–came out quite good, there are a couple dings there that I’m going to fill later. The front end is not too bad, that’s a little bit bent but I straightened that out. And here is the base and this is the bit that’s broken off that I’ve got to replicate to complete the restoration.

This is going to be a first for me–I’ve also got to try and repair a tow bar. To do this I’m using a piece of this same Matchbox blend of metal that I use, this is a door off an old taxi that I had. This car was in really terrible condition and I used it in an experiment and I actually welded it on there with a new product I’m trying out called Muggy Weld. And I was so pleased with the results that I thought “full steam ahead” on the real thing.

So to perform the pot metal restoration, I used this little gas flamethrower and Muggy Weld Super Alloy 1 low temperature solder and flux. Now I’ve cut out a piece of metal in the right size and I’ve braced it up against the base of the car model. This is part of the taxi door here and I’m hoping I can weld it on there. Just needs a little bit of heat in there and the Muggy Weld just melts and you can smear it around like peanut butter and with the flux it kind of migrates into the cracks. Seems pretty solid and actually makes quite a good bond.

Here is the back of the Matchbox car and you can see where the Muggy Weld welding rod has creeped through and made a little fillet there so it’s a really strong weld for such a small component and I’m actually able to dress it up with my grinding wheel on my Dremel and it doesn’t break off or show any signs of weakness whatsoever.

Thanks, Marty for featuring Super Alloy 1 on your YouTube channel. To view more of Marty’s Matchbox pot metal welding car restoration videos, please visit his channel:

Marty’s Makeover Magic

NotePlease observe all AWS Safety & Health Guidelines when using Muggy Weld products.

Sours: https://www.muggyweld.com/video/pot-metal-welding/
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A recent eBay lot of nine beaten up Matchboxes included a #41c Ford GT and a #61b Alvis Stalwart. These featured two-part wheels made up of plastic hubs and black tires. Something happens to these parts over the years… either the hubs shrink or the tires stretch, resulting in a loose fit, and it’s not at all uncommon to find these models with missing tires, like mine have. I’d heard that O-rings can work as replacements for these tires, and while they aren’t perfect, in some cases they look pretty darn close. I wanted to test out a few to see how they fit, so I ran down to the hardware store to try a couple different sizes.

0127191709_hdr

Let me say from the start that your local hardware store is NOT the place to buy these things unless you only need one or two. I paid eighty five cents apiece for these, while they can be bought online for six cents each, plus shipping, of course. There are also o-ring kits that you can buy pretty cheaply that have several sizes, some that will fit Matchbox cars. But I wanted to try out the sizes to see if the fit and look is right before I order a whole bunch of them.

I took some measurements of the existing tires that I wanted to replace, and the closest that I found were as follows: For the Alvis Salwart, 1/2″ O.D., 1/4″ I.D., 1/8″ cross section. For the Ford GT, 7/16″ O.D., 1/4″ I.D., 1/8″ or 3/32″ cross section. I found the exact size for the Alvis Stalwart, and I found the 3/32″ cross section for the Ford. Here are the subjective results: The Alvis Stalwart tires are a very good match. About the only difference between the O-rings and the original Matchbox part is the presence of some tiny tread grooves on the outside of the tires. Other than that, they’re nearly identical. The O-rings have a better fit on the hubs, which might be expected… they’re new and still stretchy, where the original tires have hardened considerably. I have an old Alvis Stalwart from my childhood collection that’s in OK shape except for a missing tire, so I slipped on the O-ring and shot some pictures. You can easily tell a difference if you examine the tires with a loupe, but under casual observation with the naked eye, it would be easy to miss the difference.

One of the tires on this Alvis Stalwart is an O-ring, and the others are original. Can you tell which one?

One of the tires on this Alvis Stalwart is an O-ring, and the others are original. Can you tell which one?

O-rings are even a similar width as the originals

O-rings are even a similar width as the originals

An O-ring and an original tire for comparison.

An O-ring and an original tire for comparison.

The Ford GT is a different story. The 3/32″ cross section looks pretty good in profile, but when you turn the car on its back you can see that the O-ring is narrower than the original part. Part of the problem is that the selection at the hardware store is limited… I want to try some different sizes from my online source, these may give a better fit. But you can tell that the original tires have some tread molded into the surface of the part, which is something the O-rings will never have.

0127191714
0127191714a

So the results here are definitely mixed. O-rings are a clearly inferior substitute for the #41c, but they are far better than no tires at all. And if ALL the tires on the car were replaced with O-rings, the difference wouldn’t be noticeable.

There will be other cars that will be good candidates for O-rings, such as cars with wire wheels like the 41b Jaguar or the 32b Jaguar XKE , but I don’t have one of these. (I’ve got a 32b on the way, though, and I’m looking forward to adding that one to my collection!) The 38c Ford Tractor has balloon-type front wheels, and I expect that O-rings will be a very good replacement for these… as long as the rear tires are there. The only one that I have is missing front AND rear tires, so until I can find a replacement for the rear tires, I’m not going to worry about it. The 19d Lotus racing car would look fine with O-rings, and these can be had for a song if the wheels are missing. As I find more of these, I’ll post the size data and subjective results. Again, they aren’t perfect, but in many cases they aren’t bad, either… until I can get an Anycubic Photon resin 3D printer*, these will solve a lot of Matchbox missing-tire problems.

I went ahead and ordered several sizes of O-rings from The O-Ring Store.com.  I bought four sizes… 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 for the Alvis Stalwart, 1/4 x 7/16 x 3/32 for the Ford GT, Jaguar XKE, etc., 3/16 x 7/16 x 1/8, and a few 3/8 x 5/8 x 1/8 for motorcycles (these may be a little on the fat side, but they’re close). And of course, once they came in I discovered I should’ve ordered a few 5/16 x 9/16 x 1/8, as these are the size I need to fit the International Harvester Combine that I have with a missing tire. Since I had a choice, I bought 90-durometer rings, figuring these are the closest thing to the hardness of the original plastic. I was right, but the hardness makes them a little difficult to get on the rims, so I may try some softer ones next time.

My order of "tires" from the O-Ring Store. com.

My order of “tires” from the O-Ring Store. com.

My 75b from my childhood collection was in pretty good shape, except all four tires were missing. A set of four O-rings at least makes it more presentable.

My 75b from my childhood collection was in pretty good shape, except all four tires were missing. A set of four O-rings at least makes it more presentable.

UPDATE: A reader mentioned that he orders his O-rings from McMaster-Carr. Here are the sizes he uses:

  • 1171N183 square O rings close to the Ford GT tires
  • 9452K183 size 202 o rings, for the Stalwart
  • 9262K83, 9262K913 Formula 1 tires

(Thanks, Joe!)

*And if this sounds like a plug to get Anycubic to send me a 3D printer for review, you’re exactly right. $439 will buy A LOT of Matchbox replacement parts, plus there’s the cost of the resin, and a probably long learning curve before you can get useable parts, BUT- resin-printed parts offer very fine resolution, probably the best in the non-professional category. And there are a lot of parts that we need to restore Matchboxes that just aren’t available, so 3D printing might be the best option. (And there’s also the bare-bones Sparkmaker, $239 at Amazon. It’s probably the perfect size for Matchbox parts, but it seems to be having some teething troubles… the reviews are very mixed.)

A 3D printer is definitely on my radar. I’ll probably wait a bit, since these things are constantly improving. The Sparkmaker’s software is Windows-only right now, and I’m a Mac-only person. I’ve heard a Mac version is in the works. And I just dropped fifty bucks on a handful of repair parts, which is very irritating even though I’d have to make A LOT of repair parts before a 3D printer even comes close to breaking even. Still, research is cheap. Stay tuned!

 

Sours: https://matchbox359808139.wordpress.com/


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