Amana thermostat override

Amana thermostat override DEFAULT

2246008

Programmable Electronic Thermostat

2 Heat/2 Cool, Auto Changeover, Hardwire

• 7-Day, 5-2-Day or 5-1-1-Day Programmable

• Configurable

• 2-Stage Heat/2-Stage Cool Systems

• 2-Stage Heat Pump Systems

• Large Display With Backlight

• Selectable Fahrenheit or Celsius

• Compatible with Gas, Oil, or Electric

• Relay Outputs

(minimum voltage drop in thermostat)

• Remote Sensor Compatible

• Ideally Suited for:

Residential (New Construction/Replacement)

Light Commercial

Installation, Operation &

Application Guide

www.amana-ptac.com

Parts Diagram

Up button

Down button

Right (fan) button

Left (system) button

Configuration

S1 S2 R

C

W

Y1 W2 Y2

G

switch

O/B

RESET

CONFIG

Reset switch

Icon Descriptions

Room temperature

offset activated

Fan operation icon

Lock mode activated

Cooling operation icon

Heating operation icon

Specifications

Electrical rating: • 24 VAC (18-30 VAC)

• 1 amp maximum per terminal

• 3 amp maximum total load

Temperature control range: 45°F to 90°F (7°C to 32°C) Accuracy: ± 1°F (± 0.5°C)

System configurations: 2-stage heat, 2-stage cool, heat pump, gas, oil, electric

Timing: Anti-short Cycle: 4 minutes (bypass anti-short cycle delay by returning to OFF mode for 5 seconds)

Backlight Operation: 10 seconds

Terminations: S1, S2, R, C, W/O/B, Y1, W2, Y2, G

Important Safety Information

WARNING!: Always turn off power at the main power supply before installing, cleaning, or removing

thermostat.

• This thermostat is for 24 VAC applications only; do not use on voltages over 30 VAC

• Do not short across terminals of gas valve or system control to test operation; this will damage your thermostat

and void your warranty

• All wiring must conform to local and national electrical and building codes

• Do not use air conditioning when the outdoor temperature is below 50 degrees; this can damage your A/C system

and cause personal injuries

• Use this thermostat only as described in this manual

Package Contents/Tools Required

Package includes: Amana

®

2246008 thermostat on base, thermostat cover, wiring labels, screws and wall

anchors, Installation, Operation and Application Guide

Tools required for installation: Drill with 3/16" bit, hammer, screwdriver

To Remove Existing Thermostat

ELECTRICAL SHOCK HAZARD – Turn off power at the main service panel by removing the fuse

or switching the appropriate circuit breaker to the OFF position before removing the existing

thermostat.

1. Turn off power to the heating and cooling system by removing the fuse or switching the appropriate circuit

breaker off.

2. Remove cover of old thermostat. This should expose the wires.

3. Label the existing wires with the enclosed wire labels before removing wires.

4. After labeling wires, remove wires from wire terminals.

5. Remove existing thermostat base from wall.

6. Refer to the following section for instructions on how to install this thermostat.

To Install Thermostat

ELECTRICAL SHOCK HAZARD – Turn off power at the main service panel by removing the fuse

or switching the appropriate circuit breaker to the OFF position before removing the existing

thermostat.

IMPORTANT: Thermostat installation must conform to local and national building and electrical codes and

ordinances.

Note: Mount the thermostat about five feet above the floor. Do not mount the thermostat on an outside wall, in

direct sunlight, behind a door, or in an area affected by a vent or duct.

1. Turn off power to the heating and cooling system by removing the fuse or switching the appropriate circuit breaker

off.

2. To remove cover, pull gently at the seam at the top.

3. Put thermostat base against the wall where you plan to mount it (Be sure wires will feed through the wire opening

in the base of the thermostat).

4. Mark the placement of the mounting holes.

5. Set thermostat base and cover away from working area.

6. Using a 3/16" drill bit, drill holes in the places you have marked for mounting.

7. Use a hammer to tap supplied anchors in mounting holes.

8. Align thermostat base with mounting holes and feed the control wires through slit in thermal intrusion barrier and

into wire opening.

9. Use supplied screws to mount thermostat base to wall.

10. Insert stripped, labeled wires in matching wire terminals.

CAUTION!: Be sure exposed portion of wires does not touch other wires.

11. Gently tug wire to be sure of proper connection. Double check that each wire is connected to the proper

terminal.

12. Turn on power to the system at the main service panel.

13. Configure thermostat to match the type of system you have.

14. Replace cover on thermostat by snapping it in place.

15. Test thermostat operation as described in "Testing the Thermostat".

Wiring Diagrams

Heat/Cool Systems

Optional

remote or

outdoor sensor

Transformer

120

24 VAC

VAC

Heat #1

Cool #1

Heat #2

Cool #2

Fan

* outdoor sensor only reads outdoor temperature

Single Compressor

Dual Compressor

heat pump with electric backup

heat pump with electric backup

Optional

Optional

remote or

remote or

outdoor sensor

outdoor sensor

Transformer

Transformer

120

120

24 VAC

24 VAC

VAC

VAC

Reversing Valve

Reversing Valve

Compressor

Compressor #1

Auxiliary Heat #1

Electric Heat

Compressor #2

Fan

Fan

* outdoor sensor only reads outdoor temperature

Remote Sensor Installation (Optional)

Terminals S1 and S2 can be used for an indoor remote sensor.

The indoor remote sensor is used to read the indoor temperature

in a different location. This is beneficial when the thermostat is not

mounted in the ideal location.

1. Remove cover from remote sensor housing.

2. Select an appropriate location for mounting the remote sensor.

3. Mount remote sensor unit using hardware provided.

4. Install two strand shielded wire between remote sensor and

Remote Sensor:

(Shown: Optional ICM ACC-RT103 Remote Indoor

thermostat. Shielded wire is recommended.

Sensor; for outdoor sensor, order ACC-OD103.)

Do not run remote sensor wire in conduit with other wires.

• Wire 1 should run between the S1 terminal on the thermostat

Note: Remote or outdoor sensor reading can be

and the S1 terminal on the remote sensor

displayed by simultaneously pressing the

Down and SYS buttons.

• Wire 2 should run between the S2 terminal on the thermostat

and the S2 terminal on the remote sensor

• Connect the shielding of the wire to the S2 terminal on the thermostat

5. Configure the thermostat to operate with the remote indoor sensor (see Configuration Mode setting 13).

Terminal Designator Descriptions

R – 24 VAC hot

C – 24 VAC common

W1/O/B – Configurable

W1 – 1st stage heat for non-heat pump systems

O – cool active reversing valve

B – heat active reversing valve

Y1 – 1st stage cool, 1st stage heat for heat pumps

W2 – 2nd stage heat for non-heat pump systems, Electric Heat for heat pump systems

Y2 – 2nd stage cool for 2 compressor systems, 2nd stage heat for 2 compressor heat pump systems

G – Fan

Amana® 2246008 Output Chart

1

Cool

2

Cool

1

Heat

2

ST

ND

ST

Heat/Cool

Y1,G

YI,Y2,G

W1,G*

W1,W2,G*

Heat Pump (One Compressor)

Y1,G,O

Y1,G,O

Y1,G,B

Y1,W2,G,B

Heat Pump (Two Compressors)

Y1,G,O

Y1,Y2,G,O

Y1,G,B

Y1,Y2,G,B

Electric Heat (Heat Pump Only)

N/A

N/A

W2,G

* G not energized when configured as a gas/oil system

The Amana

®

2246008 thermostat is configurable for all systems. The configuration directly affects the outputs.

Use the output chart to correctly configure and wire the thermostat to your system.

Configuration Mode

The configuration mode is used to set the Amana

®

2246008 to match your heating/cooling system. The Amana

2246008 functions with heat pump, air conditioning, gas, oil or electric heat systems.

To configure the Amana

®

2246008, perform the following steps:

1. Verify the Amana

®

2246008 is in the OFF mode.

Press the SYS (left) button until off mode displays.

2. Remove the cover of the thermostat by gently pulling near one of the corners at

the top of the thermostat.

PM

3. Press the CONFIG button for 1 second while the Amana

®

2246008 is in OFF

mode.

CONFIG

Press the up or down button to change settings within each screen.

Up button

Down button

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

Left

Right

Note: Pressing the left button will return you to the previous screen.

button

button

To exit configuration mode, press the CONFIG switch for 1 second.

Configuration Mode Settings

The setup screens for Configuration Mode are as follows:

1. Temperature Scale (F or C)

Choose Fahrenheit or Celsius.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

2. 1

st

Stage Temperature Differential (1°F to 5°F) (0.5°C to 2.5°C)

Set the number of degrees between your "setpoint" temperature and your "turn on"

temperature.

Press the up or down button to set differential value.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

3. 2

nd

Stage Temperature Differential (1°F to 5°F) (0.5°C to 2.5°C)

Set the number of degrees between when stage 1 turns on and when stage 2 turns on.

Press the up or down button to set differential value.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

4. Staged Off Outputs

Select whether the outputs for heating and cooling are staged off independently or

are satisfied simultaneously.

1 = outputs staged off independently

0 = outputs off simultaneously

Press the up or down button to set.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

5. Minimum Deadband (1°F to 9°F) (1°C to 5°C)

Set the minimum separation between heat setpoint and cool setpoint in Auto

Changeover Mode.

Press the up or down button to set deadband value.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

6. System – Set for heat pump, non-heat pump, reversing valve operation and number of compressors in your

system.

Reversing Valve

Choose

System

Active

HP

O

HP

b

Heat Pump

HP

O

HP

b

Heat

Non-Heat

Pump

Heat

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

7. Auxiliary Delay ON – (0-30 minutes) – Set the delay time in minutes for auxiliary heat

to be locked out after a call for second stage. This extra savings feature is used to

temporarily lock out auxiliary heat devices, allowing just heat pump to try to satisfy heat

Heat

ND

call.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

8. Lockout (0-8°, NITE, COOL-HEAT) – Select the number of degrees set temperature

W2,G

can be changed during keypad lockout or select to lockout during NITE period only.

COOL-HEAT lockout allows adjustment of the set temperatures to the maximum heat

set temperature selected in Step 9 and minimum cool set temperature selected in

Step 10.

Note: The mode cannot be changed when the thermostat is locked.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

9. Maximum Heat Setpoint (45°F to 90°F) (7°C to 32°C)

®

Adjust to control the maximum heat set temperature allowed.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

10. Minimum Cool Setpoint (45°F to 90°F) (7°C to 32°C)

Adjust to control the minimum cool set temperature allowed.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

OFF

11. Room Temperature Offset (+9°F to -9°F) (+4.5°C to -4.5°C)

Adjust to calibrate displayed room temperature to match actual room temperature.

S1 S2 R

C

W

Y1 W2

Y2

G

W3

Note: When not set to 0, will display.

FP

O/B

RESET

CONFIG

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

12. Maximum Cycles Allowed Per Hour (- -, 2-6)

- - = as many as needed, 2-6 = maximum cycles/hour

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

13. Temperature Sensor (1-4)

1. Only on-board sensor determines room temperature.

2. Only remote sensor determines room temperature.

3. Average temperature of on-board and remote sensor.

4. Only on-board sensor will be used until NITE period, and then only

remote sensor is used.

Note: If there is no remote sensor, option 1 must be selected.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

14. Cooling Fan Delay Off Time (0, 30, 60, 90 seconds)

Select the fan purge time for cooling.

Press the up or down button to select.

Press the right button to advance to the next screen.

Press the CONFIG button for 2 seconds to exit configuration.

Number of Compressors

Type of

or Compressor Stages

Heat

1

1

2

2

Gas

Electric

OFF

Sours: https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1400523/Amana-2246008.html

Amana offers a wide range of features on their PTAC units for both homeowners, commercial property managers, and hotels. Temperature limiting is used to mask the maximum temperature that a PTAC can be set to. This feature can save you money by allowing someone to set the unit as high or low as they want while the real limit is masked. Preenving overheating and overcooling can represent a large cost savings for property owners. This quick guide and video will show you how to make this easy change.

  1. Make sure your Amana PTAC unit is plugged in and powered off.
  2. Hold down the temperature up and down buttons then double tap the off button. C1 will display on the screen.
  3. Press the Heat button until C8 is displayed. C8 is the cooling limit.
  4. Use the temperature up and down buttons to set the lowest temperature you want the unit to be able to reach.
  5. Press the off button to save the settings.
  6. To set the heating limit, simply repeat steps 1-4, except change C9 instead of C8.

It’s that simple! You can soon be on the path to a lower energy bill while still keeping your guests happy and comfortable.

Questions? Looking to purchase an Amana PTAC? Contact us at 877-847-0050.

Sours: https://blog.totalhomesupply.com/setup-temperature-limiting-amana-ptacs/
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Do hotel thermostats with motion sensors have you waking up in a sweat?

Question: In the last few years, my husband and I have become frustrated with hotel thermostats. It seems that in an effort to “go green,” some hotels have installed motion-sensor thermostats. This makes sense during the day when we are out, but it poses a problem at night. In the warmer months, we often wake up in a sweat and notice that the thermostat reads several degrees above the set temperature. What is going on? Is there anything that can be done?

Tara Silva

Calabasas

Answer: It is not often, in searching for answers, that one can use the words “Mylar balloon” and “complain” as possible solutions. We’ll get to that shortly.

Meanwhile, Silva is right about this motion-senor business — at least, for one kind of motion sensor.

Frederick Becker, associate professor of hospitality management at York College of Pennsylvania, explains the why behind the technology. “The cost of energy, electricity in particular, is one of the most significant expenses hotels have to deal with,” he said in an email. “No hotel runs at 100% occupancy 100% of the time. When rooms are vacant, there is no need to maintain room temperatures at accepted guest comfort levels. Even when rooms are ‘occupied,’ guests are not in the room 24 hours per day.”

Enter occupancy control systems. “Hotels can both save money on energy costs and be energy-efficient / environmentally friendly,” Becker said.

Alas, those systems that rely only on motion sensors are not always guest-friendly. Unless they’re sleepwalking, guests who are abed aren’t moving in a way that a motion sensor can detect.

The solution for immediate relief is to buy a Mylar balloon (sturdier than a regular balloon) that trails strings or ribbons and let it move around your room, triggering the motion sensor.

If you Google “motion sensors,” “hotels” and “heating and cooling,” you’ll find instructions on how to disable these thermostats. I have no independent knowledge of whether this works, and even if it does, it doesn’t exactly make you an environmental hero.

The longer-term strategy is to complain to the hotel, said Jeff Raber, director of retail and hotels for Schneider Electric, an energy management company and equipment supplier.

A hotelier’s “No. 1 mission is to keep their guests comfortable,” he said. “Guest delight is their No. 1 priority; everything else falls beneath that.”

Although motion sensors are a good idea, they’re not quite a complete idea given that people would rather not spend a night leaping in and out of bed to jog the heating or cooling.

Raber notes that some systems now come with door contacts that can be part of a networked property management system. When you enter the room, the thermostat understands, thanks to a door contact and an occupancy sensor, that people have come into the room and that the system should not fiddle with the temperature, even if the occupants go to bed. When they open the door and leave the next day, the system checks again for motion, then waits 10 to 15 minutes before adjusting the temperature.

Hyatt at Olive 8, an LEED-certified hotel in Seattle, has a system that uses motion and audio detection, along with a key-card system. Many people are familiar with the key-card systems, which are often used in Europe and in Asia. Immediately after you enter the room, you put that key card in the slot and the lights, TV and more are activated. When you leave for the day, you take out the card, meaning you can’t leave on the lights or TV when you’re gone.

With this triple system, motion and audio sensors feel and hear when people are in the room and keep the cooling and heating where a guest wants it. In theory, if you remove the key card, you can’t leave on the TV to trick the system into keeping the temperature where you want it. I say “in theory” because, of course, there are ways to defeat the key-card system, but again, that may put you into the environmental bad-guy category.

The logical question is how will you know what system your hotel has so you don’t show up with a Mylar balloon for no reason. The answer is that you don’t unless you quiz the hotel well before you check in.

Accommodations haven’t done a great job of cluing us in on their systems. But taking a tip from the success many hotels have had in asking us to reuse our towels, perhaps more can be transparent about how their systems work, the consequences of tinkering with them and what the hotel is doing to keep guests comfortable while saving Mother Earth. After all, hotels want guests to have warm memories — just not the kind that involve middle-of-the-night pools of sweat.

Have a travel dilemma? Write to [email protected] We regret we cannot answer every inquiry.

Sours: https://www.latimes.com/travel/deals/la-tr-spot-20150215-story.html
How to override Amana IMC controls hotel thermostat with no motion sensor

Amana packaged terminal air conditioner units are known for their reliability, but as with any product, things can go wrong. If you are ever having trouble with an Amana PTAC a quick reset might be the easiest way to fix the problem. The manual reset process with clear any settings that you have changed and return everything back to the factory default.

 

Follow these simple steps to manually reset your Amana PTAC unit:

  1. Make sure the unit is plugged in.
  2. Carefully lift off the front plastic cover by lifting up and pulling toward you.
  3. Turn off the master power switch under the control panel. Leave off for at least 5 seconds.
  4. Push and hold both the heat and cool buttons
  5. While holding the buttons, turn the master switch back on.
  6. When the red light appears next to the off button, the system has been successfully reset.
  7. Place the front plastic cover back onto the unit and enjoy!

Do you need to replace an old unit that isn’t working? Check out our PTAC Replacement Guide or shop our full selection a of PTAC units.

Sours: https://blog.totalhomesupply.com/reset-amana-ptac/

Override amana thermostat

Override Your Hotel Room Thermostat and Set It As Hot or Cold You Like

Hotel room thermometers normally don't let you adjust the temperature above or below a certain point, which can lead to some pretty warm rooms in the summer time or chilly ones in the winter. If you want more control, here's how to override your hotel thermometer, put it in "VIP" mode, and tweak it where you like it.

Gary Leff, writing for View from the Wing, shared the video above, which shows you how it's done. Most hotel wall units (Gary noted that Hilton and Hyatt specifically tend to use this type of thermostat) that you'll have access to will work this way. The window units on the air conditioner/heaters themselves may be a bit more flexible, but give this a try on your next wall thermometer:

  • Hold down the “display” button
  • While holding that button, press “off”
  • Release off, continue to hold down display, and Press the “up” arrow button
  • Release all buttons

This trick also disables the motion sensors that many hotels use to only keep the heating and cooling system active at all when a guest is in the room—that means that you won't have to wait for a sweltering room to gradually cool off when you get back from a long day, or wait for an ice cold room to warm up in the winter.

Gary explains that you don't have to just be quirky about the temperature to use this trick—sometimes hotels try and save money by keeping the room thermostats in a certain range, leading to uncomfortable guests, and in his case, he had a room that got a ton of sunlight that warmed it up in the daytime, making it really hot, even with the thermostat turned down as far as it can go. Either way, the power is yours—to be more comfortable when you travel. Hit the link below to read more—his commenters, both at the link below and his much older post have some similar tricks for other hotel chains that may not use these units, too.

How to Override Your Hotel’s Thermostat Controls and Make it as Cool or Hot As You’d Like | View from the Wing

Sours: https://lifehacker.com/override-your-hotel-room-thermostat-and-set-it-as-hot-o-1462595059
GE hotel thermostat hack / bypass

sunjaibomma Amana AC common error codes. CODE = br. FAILURES STATUS = Brown Out Protection engaged. Power was lost or voltage is low.


Click to see full answer.

In this manner, what does FP mean on my Amana PTAC?

Anthony for Model Number pth123e50axxxab. ANSWER Anthony, The FP indicates that the freeze protection is engaged. The room temperature measured by the wireless remote thermostat or indoor ambient thermistor active sensor falls below 40 degrees.

Subsequently, question is, how do you reset an Amana PTAC unit? Follow these simple steps to manually reset your Amana PTAC unit:

  1. Make sure the unit is plugged in.
  2. Carefully lift off the front plastic cover by lifting up and pulling toward you.
  3. Turn off the master power switch under the control panel.
  4. Push and hold both the heat and cool buttons.

Moreover, how do I do a self diagnostic on Amana PTAC?

How to Start a Run Test on an Amana PTAC Unit

  1. Make sure that the PTAC unit is plugged in, but not powered on.
  2. Press and hold the temperature up and down arrows and double tap the heat button. The number 88 will appear on the display.
  3. The unit will then begin the test. The order of events is:
  4. Test is now complete.

What does BR mean on AC unit?

sunjaibomma Amana AC common error codes. CODE = br. FAILURES STATUS = Brown Out Protection engaged. Power was lost or voltage is low.

Sours: https://everythingwhat.com/what-is-amana-ptac-br

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