Interview questions for facilities coordinator

Interview questions for facilities coordinator DEFAULT

21 Interview Questions Every Facility Manager Should Ask & Answer

All of us have experienced that nervous energy in the hours leading up to a job interview. We've wondered what facility manager interview questions they will ask, what is the appropriate answer for each question, and how many candidates are up for the same position. 

Traditional job interviews are already stressful. Now that we are navigating our way through the coronavirus pandemic, many facility management interviews have gone virtual — which can make the process even more nerve-racking. Although it's important to note that not every interview will be remote. A Gartner survey from April of this year indicated 86% of organizations have replaced in-person interviews with video conferencing or phone calls.

Whether you're meeting in-person or by video, preparation is the key to acing your interview. 

Track these eight new facility management metrics to succeed in your next role.

How to prepare for your interview

Through careful study of the job description, as well as the hiring company’s history and mission statement, you can learn a lot about what facility manager interview questions you might be asked. Once you have done your research, compile a list of possible questions and practice your response.

Sometimes all it takes is one wrong answer to lose the position, so really take the time to prepare answers that showcase all that you have to offer. In this competitive job market, it could give you an edge.

Resources such as Glassdoor  or LinkedIn can help you navigate the interview process. But sifting through all the possible facility manager interview questions can be overwhelming. We have compiled a list of the most common facility manager interview questions, how to answer them, and what you should be prepared to ask at the end of your interview.

Here are some common facility manager interview questions you can expect to be asked — and how to prepare your answer.

Facility manager interview questions:

  • Tell me about yourself?
  • What are your career goals as a facilities manager?
  • What is your biggest weakness?
  • What motivates you to be the best facilities manager?
  • Why should we hire you for this FM position?
  • How would you build a digital workplace for our company?
  • How have you used data to make decisions? 
  • How would you improve the workplace experience at our company?
  • How do you stay up on the latest facility management trends? 
  • Why did you leave your last job?
  • If you were the hiring manager in this position, what would you look for?
  • What do you know about our company?
  • What are your strengths?
  • Why do you want this job?
  • Do you have any questions for me?
  • What facility management certifications do you have?
  • What workplace software systems and technology do you have experience using?
  • What building repairs or projects do you have experience leading?
  • What facility management skills are you still working to develop?
  • How would you help us manage a safe return to the office?
  • How would you support our hybrid workplace?

If you're applying for a new job, you need to have an answer to these facility manager interview questions. 

1. Tell me about yourself

This is a standard question and your response sets the tone for the rest of the interview. In preparing for this question, think about what the interviewer is looking for. You want to sell what the buyer is looking for, so be sure to match your qualifications with the specifics of this particular job. You only have 2-3 minutes to answer this question, so speak only of your professional career. Start with your present position and relate how it qualifies you for the job you are interviewing for.

Example: “Recently, I have worked for ABC Company as Facility Manager for the Northeast Branch. I lead numerous projects including a workspace redesign and software implementation. Through my efforts, our division saw a 37% increase in productivity and saved $1.2 million dollars in annual overhead costs.”

What not to say: "My name is... I grew up in... I graduated five years ago from the..., with a bachelor's in... Upon graduating high school, I went to Denver for 5 years... I've worked in a variety of jobs…”

You'll usually be asked this before the other facility manager interview questions, so you need to set the tone for the rest of your interview by laying the groundwork from the start. Drive home the message that you're a great fit for this role — and when the following facility manager interview questions come up, you'll be able to reinforce it.

2. What are your career goals as a facility manager?

These types of facility manager interview questions could be asked in any number of ways, such as “What are you looking for in a job?” or “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?”. What the interviewer is looking for is always the same: They want you to connect the dots between your professional goals and the company. Directly relate your short and long-term goals to the job features, which will show you have done your research and are well-informed. If you know what you do not want in a position or why you are leaving your current job, incorporate that as well. Just be sure not to shed a bad light on your current employer, as that will reflect poorly on you. 

Example: You are working as part of the facility management team and your goal is to become the assistant facilities manager in the next two years and in the next 5 years, you will be the regional facility manager.

What not to say: When answering one of these facility manager interview questions, try not to express goals that have little or no relation to the job you are interviewing for. For example, if you are applying for a position on the facilities management team, but your career goal is to become the head of marketing in the next 5 years.

Get talking points on recalibrating for the post-pandemic workplace to impress your hiring manager.

3. What are your strengths?

This is one of the most common facility manager interview questions, regardless of the position you have applied for. Even if the interviewer does not ask this question, you should be fully prepared with an answer, as it will help you answer other questions. The interviewer is looking to determine if your strengths align with the company’s needs and what qualities, skills, and/or experience you have that set you apart from the competition. Sit down and create a list of your strengths. Then, go back and refine your list to only the most relevant and be prepared to give real-world examples of each strength. 

Example: "I think one of my greatest strengths is as a problem solver. I have the ability to see a situation from various perspectives and I can get my work done even in the face of difficult obstacles. I also feel that my communication skills are top-notch. I am just as comfortable presenting to senior executives as I am mediating a conflict between junior team members. I worked in Human Resources, which allowed me to gain valuable insight into the needs of my fellow employees.”

What not to say: Many candidates choose strengths that do not stand out. When these type of facility manager interview questions come up, be sure to give an answer that stands out in the interviewer’s mind and leads back to why you are most qualified for the position.

4. What is your biggest weakness?

This question is asked in virtually every job interview and is designed to determine your critical thinking and self-awareness skills. Be prepared to answer this question as it is designed to be an eliminator question, weeding out those candidates that don’t deal well under pressure. Try to provide a weakness that everyone can relate to and never use an example that shows inappropriateness in your job. Give an honest, confident answer and always show how you have resolved these issues, either partly or wholly.

Example: "I tend to be a perfectionist, therefore it has been difficult for me to delegate to others. But I have found out that in order to develop the organization, as well as my team, everyone in the company must be experienced with many tasks.”

What not to say: "I am a perfectionist and therefore, I rarely believe in anyone who can work as well as me. As a result, I avoid delegating important tasks to others.”

5. What motivates you to be the best facilities manager?

Regardless of what profession you are a part of, motivation is the driving force behind your success. This is a personal question that only you can answer. Motivating examples are challenge, achievement, and recognition. 

Examples: "I have always been motivated by both the challenge of finishing projects on time as I help the organization achieve our goal," or “I want to be successful in my job, for my own personal satisfaction as well as for my employer and our customers.”

6. Why should we hire you for this FM position?

The interviewer could also pose this question as: “Why do you think you would do well at this job?” To properly answer these types of facility manager interview questions, you must be able to sell yourself. When preparing for the interview, make a list of all your positive attributes and how they relate to the FM profession, as well as the industry the organization is a part of. (For example: you are a quick learner and/or have excellent communication skills). Showcase your professional ambitions, such as motivation and your dedication to your position and the Facilities Management profession. Always highlight the similarities between your current job and the one you are interviewing for.

Example: "I am a quick learner and perform better under pressure. I adapt well to change and pride myself on motivating my teammates as we work to achieve the company’s common goals.”

What not to say: Avoid providing a laundry list of all your positive attributes; limit your list to those relevant to the position you are interviewing for. 

7. How would you support the digital workplace at our company?

As workplaces shift toward the digital, so do the expectations of workplace leaders. As a Deloitte report said, it's the facility manager's responsibility to think ahead about the next steps for "the change in mobility, the layout of the offices, and contact with suppliers". You’ll want to showcase that you understand what the digital workplace supports and how you can contribute to these elements. Be prepared to talk intelligently about the digital workplace and its relationship to flexibility, mobility, and connectivity. 

Recommended: 5 Essential Elements of a Productive, Digital Workplace

Think about how your vision and strategy align with these elements. How would you build a safe environment that encourages employees to communicate and collaborate? How would you design a space that is well-received by employees with different kinds of personalities and work styles?

Example: "I would start by ensuring every employee has the digital tools they need to stay connected and be productive, no matter where they are working. Employees expect the technology they use in the workplace to be just as easy and user-friendly as the apps they use at home. And in a 2018 CBRE study, 59% of executives said they plan to add mobile apps that make it easier for employees to navigate the workplace and find the resources they need — so I'd start there."

What not to say: "Building a digital workplace? That wasn't in the job description..." 

8. How have you used data to make decisions?

In the modern-day workplace, data is the new oil. Facilities managers need to know how to effectively collect and analyze workplace data and use it to make improvements. 

Showcase your skills in this realm by providing specific examples of how you’ve used data to improve efficiency in the workplace. Be detailed in describing the types of information you used and how you gathered it. You want to let employers see that you can make objective decisions based on data rather than simply going off assumptions.

This is also a chance for you to showcase the types of workplace technology you’ve used (for example, IWMS). Experience in this space and knowledge of the latest technology trends are characteristics that are sure to make you stand out. Consider discussing recent developments in technology, such as Space-Right™, that support workplace leaders as they plan a safe return to work.

Example: "In my last role, we used IoT sensors to collect space utilization data, which revealed that many of our private offices were only being used half the time. As a result, we converted those private offices into small conference rooms people could reserve when they needed them. This improved our space utilization by nearly 50%.” 

What not to do: Don’t be caught off-guard by these types of facility manager interview questions. Even if your experience in this area has been limited, you need to demonstrate you understand the importance of using data and speak to what you’ve done so far.

Facility Management Metrics

9. How would you improve the workplace experience at our company?

The primary purpose of a corporation is no longer to create value for shareholders but to invest in all stakeholders—including employees. In a recent Fortune 500 CEO survey, 97.2% of top CEOs said keeping employees safe and productively employed is their top concern, the number one priority by rank.

Recommended: 9 Ways to Help Employees Feel Safe When Returning to Work

Considering safety and employee experience are top of mind for business leaders, they should also be a priority for facilities managers. According to bestselling author Jacob Morgan, the employee experience consists of three things: 

  • The physical workplace
  • Workplace technology
  • The company culture, influenced by policy

Facilities managers can make meaningful improvements in the workplace experience by creating an environment that supports collaboration and productivity and choosing workplace technology that reduces friction. When you're asked one of these types of facility mangaer interview questions, you should give an example of an improvement you made in a previous role that may be applicable in your new role. 

Example: "At my last workplace, reserving conference rooms had become a huge source of frustration. We implemented a desk booking solution, which made it much easier for people to find available rooms and reserve them at a moment’s notice.” 

What not to do: Don’t make the mistake of assuming the employee experience is primarily an HR responsibility. Take ownership of your role in it!

10. How do you stay up on the latest facility management trends?

This is your opportunity to show you're a lifelong learner who embraces change. It's also a chance for you to show how you would bring new ideas to the company, which will make you invaluable. Be prepared to talk about relevant blogs or podcasts you subscribe to, as well as any workplace conferences you've attended. 

Example: "I'm a member of my local IFMA chapter and attend meetings regularly. I also enjoy listening to the Workplace Innovator podcast."

What not to do: Don't respond to these types of facility manager interview questions with a blank stare — show you're invested in the FM community! 

11. Why did you leave your last job?

This is one of the most commonly asked facility manager interview questions in the interview process, so be prepared with an answer. Answer honestly, but avoid answers that shed you and your work in a negative light.

Example: “There is no opportunity for promotion in my current position and I am ready to take on new opportunities and challenges.”

What not to do: Avoid any answers that speak ill of your old boss, company, or colleagues. While we have all had setbacks at some point in our careers, this is not the time to discuss your troubles in a previous position.

12. If you were the hiring manager for this position, what would you look for?

Prepare for this question before going in, by really examining what exactly this job would entail and how you would measure success. Facility manager interview questions like this one are designed to be a trap, weeding out those candidates that don’t have a clear understanding as to what their role would be. The facilities management role is changing, and FM leaders are being asked to take on more strategic responsibilities. They need to be able to demonstrate their worth with facility management metrics that prove they are maximizing space utilization, reducing costs, and increasing workplace productivity. And they need to be skilled at using workplace technology (such as IWMS software) not only to get the job done but also to enhance the employee experience. 

Example: Say you would hire either the best candidate for the job or an individual possessing the qualities and strengths you told the interviewer you hold. By doing this, you make yourself the candidate you would hire without explicitly saying this.

Be sure to focus on qualities that are especially relevant during this time. Emphasize your communication skills, intentional decision-making abilities, organization, and agility — all qualities that will be essential as businesses navigate the current and future crises.

What not to do: Never say that you are the best candidate for the job, as you have no idea what qualifications the other candidates hold.

13. What do you know about our company?

As a facilities manager, you will be expected to be a leader in every facet of the organization. To do your job properly, you must know every aspect of the company you work for and the industry it is a part of. You must also show a willingness to consistently learn and grow. This is your first opportunity to put those skills to work. Anyone can read the company’s mission and spout out the information on the “About Us” page. Dig deeper for information and relate the organization and position back to your passions and experience.

Example: If you find that the company is very involved in raising money for animal rights, talk about how you are a foster for the Humane Society or raised money for the animals in the local 5K race.

14. Why do you want this job?

This is another instance of facility manager interview questions in which the interviewer is probing to see how well you understand this position, what all it entails, how well you might match the job requirements, and what appeals to you most about the position. Your answer should be focused on what you can offer to strengthen the company and, in doing so, you should demonstrate that you fully understand what the role entails.  

Example: “One of the reasons I’m so excited about this role is because it allows me to leverage my facility management skills on a broader basis and face more complex challenges.”

What not to say: “I like your salary and benefits package.” OR “I believe that this job will help me assume another level of responsibility in my career.” Take the emphasis off your personal reasons and make it about how your professional experience can positively impact the organization.

15. Do you have any questions for me?

So, now that you have gotten through the initial part of the facility manager interview questions, the focus turns to you. At the end of the interview, you are always given the opportunity to ask questions of the interviewing manager. The number one mistake a candidate can make is to not have any questions for the interviewer. You may have been the leading candidate up until now, but if your questions are not up to par, you could fall to dead last.

Ask questions that spark conversation — these typically begin with “who", "why", "when", or "how”. Avoid close-ended questions that can be answered in one word. These questions typically start with “is", "does", "did", "would", or "has.”

In addition to specific facility manager interview questions, Forbes recently posted an article suggesting COVID-19-related questions to ask potential employers.

A few examples are:
  • “Now that we have discussed my qualifications, do you have any concerns about me fulfilling the responsibilities of this position?”
  • "What are the company's biggest challenges right now and in what ways will this role help alleviate those challenges?"
  • “As my direct manager for this position, what are the three top priorities you would first like to see accomplished?”
  • "I know things are quite uncertain right now but as we continue to navigate this time, what are the company’s top priorities and plans for the next few months?"
  • “In what area could your team use a little polishing?”
  • “Why did you come to ABC Company?”
Do not:
  • Ask how many vacation days the position offers.
  • Tell the interviewing manager that all your questions have been answered already.

Technical questions for a facility manager

In addition to these questions, you should be prepared to answer more technical questions about your background and experience as a facility manager. Here are a few: 

16. What facility management certifications do you have? 

While not all facility management jobs require certification, becoming certified is a great way to set yourself apart from the competition. It demonstrates your commitment to the profession and shows you have expertise in specific areas. IFMA offers a number of certifications and professional development programs, including: 

  • Facility Management Professional (FMP)
  • Certified Facility Manager (CFM)
  • Facility Management Learning System
  • Sustainability Facility Professional
  • RICS Chartered Qualification
  • RICS Associate Qualification

You may also consider becoming certified through the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International, which offers courses on asset management, energy efficiency and sustainability, and real estate and property management. 

What not to do: Don't be caught offguard by this question. Even if you don't have any certifications, you should be familiar with the most common ones and be working toward obtaining at least one of them.

17. What workplace software systems and technology do you have experience using? 

It's one thing to give examples of how you've used data to make decisions in previous roles; it's another to be comfortable using the technology your prospective company already has. If you know where to look to get the latest space utilization data, how to update your floor plans to accommodate changing capacity, and how to quickly compile a report to justify consolidating two underused buildings, you'll have less of a learning curve in your new role. 

Even if you haven't used the same software the company has, experience with a similar system is always helpful. If this question doesn't come up, asking the interviewer what software they use gives you the opportunity to share your knowledge. If they don't already have a system in place, they may be looking to you for recommendations. In this case, it's important to show them you know how to evaluate your options to find the best workplace software system. 

What not to do: Don't pretend to be familiar with workplace technology you haven't used before. While it may help you get the job, you don't want to start a position under false pretenses. 

18. What building repairs or projects do you have experience leading? 

Facility management involves overseeing building construction, renovation, maintenance, and much more. While you don't necessarily need a construction background, you do need to be able to speak the language and have strong project management skills. You should know your way around computer-aided design software, for instance, and be able to read blueprints. You also need to be able to manage multiple vendors while keeping a close eye on costs and the overall project timeline. 

What not to do: Don't exaggerate your level of involvement in previous facility management projects. If someone else led the project and you assisted, that's still valuable experience. And don't take all the credit. Facility management is a team sport, and you want to demonstrate you're a team player. Be sure to emphasize how you worked with different department leaders and vendors to get the job done. 

19. What facility management skills are you still working to develop?

Like the question about your greatest weakness, this is an opportunity to reflect and be honest, not a moment for humblebragging. Think about this question before your interview and be prepared with a thoughtful response. Perhaps you haven't been as involved in facility maintenance in previous roles, but you're eager to take on the added responsibility. Maybe you haven't had as much input in corporate real estate strategy in the past, but you know you can add a lot of value here as the company rethinks its use of office space. Whatever facility management experience you lack, focus on why it's important to you and what you're doing to grow in this area. 

What not to say: Don't give a canned answer based on what you think the interviewer wants to hear. Yes, most of us could improve our communication skills or become better at prioritizing tasks, but this doesn't reveal much about you as a potential facility manager. 

20. How would you help us manage a safe return to the office? 

Following the pandemic, helping people return to the office safely is a facility manager's most important responsibility. Everyone is facing these challenges for the first time, so it's OK that it's your first rodeo too. Be prepared to talk about how you would help the company protect its workforce in a variety of ways, including: 

If you can recommend return-to-office technology solutions to make these tasks easier, that's even better. 

Safer workplace solutions

What not to say: Don't make assumptions about how a return to the office will look. Acknowledge that every company has different needs, and don't be afraid to ask for clarification about what your potential employer envisions. 

21. How would you support our hybrid workplace?

The hybrid workplace is here to stay, which means you'll have a lot to consider beyond coronavirus concerns. For instance, if the company plans to move away from assigned seating, you'll need a process for managing desk hoteling. You will also need to monitor space utilization more closely so you can make adjustments accordingly and better plan for the future. 

Reservation software and occupancy sensors can help you identify trends and ensure you have the space to meet your needs for years to come. Making the transition to a hybrid workplace is just as much about managing cultural change, so you'll also need to reconsider your policies and amenities. What may have been important to employees when they came into the office daily may be less of a concern today. For instance, instead of visiting the cafeteria daily or going off-site for lunch, they might be more likely to order food and have it delivered to the office. 

What not to say: While implementing the right technology is a critical part of both returning to the office and supporting the hybrid workplace, don't ignore the importance of strategy. As a facility manager, developing and leading that strategy will be a big part of your job. 

Taking the next step in your facility management career

Now that you've made it through the interview and hopefully landed the job, you want to make the best impression in your first 90 days. Ask your new boss how they will define success for your role and what three to five business objectives are the highest priority for your company in the next year. Determine what you can do to help support those objectives and develop your own priority list. 

This will make it easier to stay focused on what's most important even when you're dealing with urgent matters each day. 

For instance, if one of your company objectives is to expand into the European market, you'll need to determine how many new employees will need office space there in the coming year and what technology and amenities will be most important to them.

There will always be new employees who need desks and equipment, assets to maintain, and plumbing emergencies to attend to, but you also bring tremendous strategic value to the organization as a facility manager. Stay focused on the facility management metrics that matter most, and  check out these recommendations from facility leaders to have a successful start! 

Sours: https://www.iofficecorp.com/blog/21-interview-questions-every-facility-manager-should-ask-and-answer

Facility Coordinator Interview Questions

1Provide an example of a time when you were able to demonstrate excellent listening skills. What was the situation and outcome?2Share an effective method you have used for registration of participants. Provide an experience.3What is the key to success when communicating with the public.4Share an experience you had in dealing with a difficult person and how you handled the situation. 5Share an experience in which you successfully shared a difficult piece of information. (Make sure that the candidate has open lines of communication.)6Tell me how you organize, plan, and prioritize your work.7Share an example of a time you had to gather information from multiple sources. How did you determine which information was relevant?8Please share an experience in which you presented to a group. What was the situation and how did it go?9Give me an example of when you thought outside of the box. How did it help your employer?10Provide an experience that demonstrates your ability to manage time effectively. What were the challenges and results?11Share an experience in which you successfully coordinated with others. How about a coordination effort that was not as successful? 12Name a time when you identified strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions to problems. What was the impact?13Share an experience in which your attention to detail and thoroughness had an impact on your last company. 14Provide an example of a time when you successfully organized a diverse group of people to accomplish a task.15How do you balance cooperation with others and independent thinking? Share an example. (Try to determine if the candidate has a cooperative attitude or is otherwise good-natured.)
Sours: https://www.jobinterviewquestions.com/event-preparation/facility-coordinator
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In this article, we explore some of the most common interview questions asked during a facilities coordinator interview along with some great answers to help you win the job.

Are you sitting comfortably? Let’s begin!

1. Tell me about your teamwork skills in relation to a FACILITIES COORDINATOR position?

Facilities coordinator’s have to play important roles in a team or group. Your ability in setting relationships with other team members should be appeared in your interview answers and you should mention your contribution into the success of the team.

2. What experience do you have when it comes to discussing our recently posted FACILITIES COORDINATOR position?

Answer tips:

Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you know you do not have much experience in the job you are applying for, plan for this question ahead of time and ensure you can provide some relatable examples based on what you have done.

Almost all interviewers will appreciate confidence and pride in the work experience you have earned and your passion in transfering these valuable skills to your future role or position.

Answer sample

Ever since my first paper route at age 10 I’ve been doing something to keep myself busy and earn money. Back then, it was obviously about earning some spending money. What I didn’t realize was that I was actually starting the journey of establishing what I liked to do and how I fit in to the grand scheme of things. I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. It was here that I discovered what I was passionate about and what I wanted to do. I enrolled in college to get my degree in computer sciences, and I have been working around technology ever since.

3. Our field is always changing. As such, what have you done with regards to personal development when it comes to a FACILITIES COORDINATOR POSITION in the last 12 months?

Answer tips:

Here is an opportunity for you to showcase a wide variety of things you may have done both personally and professionally that will get your potential employers interested. Be sure to think about this one in advance in the event that it comes up.

Keep in mind, one of the key things that employers look for is an applicant who is self motivated and goal oriented.

Even if you don’t have something that is specific to the role you are applying for, don’t be afraid to list hobbies or other non-work related activities here. Again, this shows your employer you are the go-getter they are looking for.

In the end, you want to ensure that you are leaving your interviewer with the impression that you are motivated, self sufficient, and manage your time effectively.

Answer samples

That is a really great question. While I haven’t had the opportunity to develop within this particular role per se, I have actually become very involved in my local foodbank this year. This has taught me a great deal about community, teamwork, and taking initiative.
I took it upon myself to enroll in a summer business admin course at the local community college. Through this, I picked up some really great knowledge on communication and teamwork, as well as further develop overall managerial skills. Though it may not be directly applicable to this particular job, I believe the overall experience I gained could be a real asset here.

4. Tell me about yourself

In polling hundreds of different companies & HR departments, this is by far one of the most frequently asked questions in any job interview. Your interviewer will use this as an icebreaker, ideally to put you at ease and get you speaking openly and honestly.

While you definitely want to be prepared for this question, you certainly don’t want to make your answer sound memorized. Keep in mind, while this question may sound like an invitation to share your life story, you can be assured your interviewer has very little interest in hearing about everything you’ve ever done.

The person giving the interview has a job to do as well – respect their time. Unless you are asked about something specific, focus on your education, your work history, relatable hobbies and outside interests, as well as your current situation.

Be sure to start chronologically and tell a linear story. Start where you feel is sensical, then work your way up to the present.

5. I like what I’m hearing but we’ve got a ton of great candidates. Why should we hire you?

An easy question to answer well with one caveat – don’t slam your fellow interviewee’s. On the one hand, you have an opportunity to really stand out from the pack. Alternatively, You shouldn’t assume the skills of other applicants. Focus on your own strengths, and if the interviewer hasn’t given you an opportunity to mention that one “slam dunk” quality about yourself, now would be the time.

Is there a wrong way to answer this question? Consider the responses below:

  • “I really need a job right now”
  • “I need the money”
  • “Your office is really close to my house”
  • “I’ve always been interested in what you guys do”

Notice any commonality here? All of these answers demonstrate a benefit to you. While every employer assumes that these sorts of things play in on some level, these are not the reasons they are going to hire you.

In summation, clearly illustrate what in specific has made you a good employee, and how you envision yourself contributing to and benefiting the company.

6. I’m curious – how did you come to find out about our company and what do you know about us?

This can be a great way to stand out from other applicants and demonstrate initiative. Almost every company will have a website, Facebook page, Instagram account, or some sort of digital footprint. Spend a bit of time doing some online research:

  • If they have a website, check out their “About us” or “Culture/Mission/Vision” pages.
  • Who are some of the principal people who work there? Who are the founders?
  • What sorts of things does this company care about? Do they donate to a particular cause or charity? Which one(s)?
  • What are their core values? Which of their core values resonate with you?
  • Has the company been in the news recently or have they won any awards (Social Media can be a great place to find this information).

While your interviewer won’t expect you to have in-depth company history, a little here can go a long way.

7. I don’t expect you to go into too much detail – but why are you leaving your last job?

An innocent question. But a question that if answered improperly, can be a deal breaker. While many individuals will be looking to a new job as a means of increasing their salary, “not being paid well enough at your last job” is not something you want to mention to your interviewer. After all, are you not likely to leave this particular job if you found you could make more down the street?

If you’re currently employed and leaving of your own accord, craft your response around enhancing your career development and a seeking out of new challenges.

If your current employer is downsizing, be honest about it, remain positive, but keep it brief. If your employer fired you or let you go for cause, be prepared to give a brief – but honest – reply. No matter how tempting it may be, or how “unfair it was that they let you go” steer clear away from any and all drama and negativity. Any experienced employer understands that sometimes things happen. Staying positive is key here.

8. What are your strengths?

While this question is an invitation to do some chest pounding, remember to illustrate strengths that will benefit the employer and arerelative to the position. For example:

  • being a problem solver
  • being a motivator
  • being a natural leader
  • the ability to perform under pressure
  • a positive attitude
  • loyalty

Are typically all solid strengths, but again, consider the position. For example, mentioning you are an excellent “team player” in a job where you largely work alone suddenly becomes irrelevant to the employer and demonstrates a genuine lack of self awareness.

Beyond this, present your strengths with confidence – this is not the time to be modest.

9. What are your weaknesses?

Another tricky one. The purpose of this question is to see how you view and evaluate yourself.

One the one hand, if you suggest you don’t have any weaknesses, your interviewer will almost certainly see you as a lair, egotistical, or both.

Don’t fall into the trap of trying to present a positive skill in disguise as a weakness, like “I work too hard” or “I am a perfectionist”. Any experienced interviewer will see through this in a heartbeat.

Additionally, revealing that “I’m not really a morning person and have been known to come in late” raises immediate and obvious red flags.

The trick here is to respond realistically by mentioning a small, work related weakness and what you are doing or have done to overcome it.

10. What do you see yourself doing in five years?

This one is all about job commitment.

Some people make job hopping a career in of itself, and your answer here can be telling. Here, your interviewer is determining if you are:

  • someone who sets goals
  • someone who has a vision
  • someone who is reliable
  • someone who demonstrates commitment
  • someone who is loyal

While no interviewer expects someone to stay at a company forever, try and craft your response in such a way that shows progression in your career, and alignment with the Company’s needs and future. Again, self awareness is key – your employer doesn’t want to send you down an unwanted path, resulting in wasted time and energy for everyone.

11. What are your salary expectations?

Many consider this question to be a loaded gun – dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced. Often times, an interviewee will start talking salary before they’ve had an opportunity to illustrate their skill set and value making any sort of leverage valueless. Here, knowledge is power, as salary often comes down to negotiation. Do some research into your industry to establish base rates of pay based on seniority and demand but keep in mind – your employer is hiring you for what they believe you are worth, and how much benefit they feel you will provide.

One relatively safe approach is simply asking the interviewer about the salary range. If you wish to avoid the question entirely, respond by saying that “money isn’t a key factor” and your primary goal is to advance in your career.

12. Do you have any questions?

This one you can almost be assured will be asked, and you better have some ready.

By asking questions you demonstrate initiative, and show that you care enough about the job to have done some research. Ask questions that focus on areas where you can be an asset. Beyond this, other questions may be more direct including productivity, expectations, training, and other logistics. All this being said, try and limit the questions to no more than three or four.

Lastly you’ll want to ask about the next step in the process and when to expect to hear about the position.

Top job interview materials:

For more details, please click links below:

1. Top 10 job interview books

2. 10 things to do after every job interview

8 bonus tips for knocking it out of the park:

1. Background Research

As indicated above, research on the company you’re applying for is critically important. Arm yourself with knowledge on the products, services, and types of customers this company deals with. You may even want to let them know who you feel their competition is! Beyond trying to make yourself look good, researching the culture of the company can provide great insights into whether or not you and your potential employer are aligned.

2. Practice makes perfect

To be certain, interviews do not always follow the same format and each interviewer will have his or her own style. That said, there are certain questions you can expect to be asked in almost any interview for any position. By understanding and practicing responses for these “oldies but goodies”, you can show up to each interview that much more confident.

3. Have some examples ready

While many candidates tell their interviewer that they posses certain desirable qualities, the proof as they say, is in the pudding. Spend some time in advance of your interview coming up with concrete examples of prior work achievements and how they demonstrate a desired ability. Be prepared for the recruiter’s questions and to anticipate them based on job position requirements. Instead of simply saying “I am well organized”, trying attaching an example or strategy. “I am a well organized person - here is an example of a project I spear-headed where organization was clutch”. Looking for the slam dunk? Finish your response with “Did that help answer your question?”.

4. Dressing for Success

First impressions can make or break so many things in society, and your interviewer’s impression of you is no exception. Whether anyone is willing to admit to it or not, the reality is you will be judged from the moment you arrive at the door. This is where some of the aforementioned research comes into play. What is the culture of the company like? Are they a highly formal suit-and-tie affair, or a casual silicon valley “hipster” organization? If you under-dress, you can appear to be too relaxed, and someone who does not appear to be taking this position seriously. However, overdressing can be perceived as over compensation. When in doubt, dress sharp, in classic business casual.

5. Play it cool

Assuming you have done some practice, you are ready to play it cool - as well you should. Make sure you’ve planned out your route well in advance, and provided ample extra time for unexpected traffic and parking issues. You should smile when greeted, and keep in mind that your interviewer may be just as nervous as you. During the interview, speak clearly and deliberately. Your body language is also important; don’t slouch back in your chair or appear “hunched over” in a defensive position. Sit tall, proud, and confident.

6. Be honest

Some candidates think using elaborate techniques to “talk around” difficult questions keeps them in the power position. A much better approach is honesty. If you are asked a question and simply don’t believe you have well developed skills in that area, don’t be afraid to let the interviewer know, rather than answering with unrelated and tangential examples. Try taking control in these situations by saying something like “While I don’t have experience in that particular area, I feel my experience in this area may be beneficial”.

7. Don’t be afraid to close the deal

Once the interview is over, the likelihood is both you and the interviewer have a good idea of where one another stand. As you stand up post interview and engage in a final handshake, be upfront. Confidence here can go a long way. If you believe you nailed the interview, be bold: “I’m going to be straight with you - I think that went really well and I think I’d be a great asset here. Where do I stand as of now?”. Alternatively, if you don’t think it went well…you probably have your answer already.

8. Be sure to ask questions

Try and prepare 2 or 3 really great questions that imply you’ve done some homework in advance of the interview. You can really impress your interviewer by asking practical questions regarding specifics about the company as well as the role itself.

Sours: https://interviewquestions247.com/2013/10/facilities-coordinator-interview-questions-answers.html
Preparing for an Interview in Facilities Management

In this article, we explore some of the most common interview questions asked during a facility coordinator interview along with some great answers to help you win the job.

Are you sitting comfortably? Let’s begin!

1. Tell me about your teamwork skills in relation to a FACILITY COORDINATOR position?

Facility coordinator’s have to play important roles in a team or group. Your ability in setting relationships with other team members should be appeared in your interview answers and you should mention your contribution into the success of the team.

2. What experience do you have when it comes to discussing our recently posted FACILITY COORDINATOR position?

Answer tips:

Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you know you do not have much experience in the job you are applying for, plan for this question ahead of time and ensure you can provide some relatable examples based on what you have done.

Almost all interviewers will appreciate confidence and pride in the work experience you have earned and your passion in transfering these valuable skills to your future role or position.

Answer sample

Ever since my first paper route at age 10 I’ve been doing something to keep myself busy and earn money. Back then, it was obviously about earning some spending money. What I didn’t realize was that I was actually starting the journey of establishing what I liked to do and how I fit in to the grand scheme of things. I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. It was here that I discovered what I was passionate about and what I wanted to do. I enrolled in college to get my degree in computer sciences, and I have been working around technology ever since.

3. Our field is always changing. As such, what have you done with regards to personal development when it comes to a FACILITY COORDINATOR POSITION in the last 12 months?

Answer tips:

Here is an opportunity for you to showcase a wide variety of things you may have done both personally and professionally that will get your potential employers interested. Be sure to think about this one in advance in the event that it comes up.

Keep in mind, one of the key things that employers look for is an applicant who is self motivated and goal oriented.

Even if you don’t have something that is specific to the role you are applying for, don’t be afraid to list hobbies or other non-work related activities here. Again, this shows your employer you are the go-getter they are looking for.

In the end, you want to ensure that you are leaving your interviewer with the impression that you are motivated, self sufficient, and manage your time effectively.

Answer samples

That is a really great question. While I haven’t had the opportunity to develop within this particular role per se, I have actually become very involved in my local foodbank this year. This has taught me a great deal about community, teamwork, and taking initiative.
I took it upon myself to enroll in a summer business admin course at the local community college. Through this, I picked up some really great knowledge on communication and teamwork, as well as further develop overall managerial skills. Though it may not be directly applicable to this particular job, I believe the overall experience I gained could be a real asset here.

4. Tell me about yourself

In polling hundreds of different companies & HR departments, this is by far one of the most frequently asked questions in any job interview. Your interviewer will use this as an icebreaker, ideally to put you at ease and get you speaking openly and honestly.

While you definitely want to be prepared for this question, you certainly don’t want to make your answer sound memorized. Keep in mind, while this question may sound like an invitation to share your life story, you can be assured your interviewer has very little interest in hearing about everything you’ve ever done.

The person giving the interview has a job to do as well – respect their time. Unless you are asked about something specific, focus on your education, your work history, relatable hobbies and outside interests, as well as your current situation.

Be sure to start chronologically and tell a linear story. Start where you feel is sensical, then work your way up to the present.

5. I like what I’m hearing but we’ve got a ton of great candidates. Why should we hire you?

An easy question to answer well with one caveat – don’t slam your fellow interviewee’s. On the one hand, you have an opportunity to really stand out from the pack. Alternatively, You shouldn’t assume the skills of other applicants. Focus on your own strengths, and if the interviewer hasn’t given you an opportunity to mention that one “slam dunk” quality about yourself, now would be the time.

Is there a wrong way to answer this question? Consider the responses below:

  • “I really need a job right now”
  • “I need the money”
  • “Your office is really close to my house”
  • “I’ve always been interested in what you guys do”

Notice any commonality here? All of these answers demonstrate a benefit to you. While every employer assumes that these sorts of things play in on some level, these are not the reasons they are going to hire you.

In summation, clearly illustrate what in specific has made you a good employee, and how you envision yourself contributing to and benefiting the company.

6. I’m curious – how did you come to find out about our company and what do you know about us?

This can be a great way to stand out from other applicants and demonstrate initiative. Almost every company will have a website, Facebook page, Instagram account, or some sort of digital footprint. Spend a bit of time doing some online research:

  • If they have a website, check out their “About us” or “Culture/Mission/Vision” pages.
  • Who are some of the principal people who work there? Who are the founders?
  • What sorts of things does this company care about? Do they donate to a particular cause or charity? Which one(s)?
  • What are their core values? Which of their core values resonate with you?
  • Has the company been in the news recently or have they won any awards (Social Media can be a great place to find this information).

While your interviewer won’t expect you to have in-depth company history, a little here can go a long way.

7. I don’t expect you to go into too much detail – but why are you leaving your last job?

An innocent question. But a question that if answered improperly, can be a deal breaker. While many individuals will be looking to a new job as a means of increasing their salary, “not being paid well enough at your last job” is not something you want to mention to your interviewer. After all, are you not likely to leave this particular job if you found you could make more down the street?

If you’re currently employed and leaving of your own accord, craft your response around enhancing your career development and a seeking out of new challenges.

If your current employer is downsizing, be honest about it, remain positive, but keep it brief. If your employer fired you or let you go for cause, be prepared to give a brief – but honest – reply. No matter how tempting it may be, or how “unfair it was that they let you go” steer clear away from any and all drama and negativity. Any experienced employer understands that sometimes things happen. Staying positive is key here.

8. What are your strengths?

While this question is an invitation to do some chest pounding, remember to illustrate strengths that will benefit the employer and arerelative to the position. For example:

  • being a problem solver
  • being a motivator
  • being a natural leader
  • the ability to perform under pressure
  • a positive attitude
  • loyalty

Are typically all solid strengths, but again, consider the position. For example, mentioning you are an excellent “team player” in a job where you largely work alone suddenly becomes irrelevant to the employer and demonstrates a genuine lack of self awareness.

Beyond this, present your strengths with confidence – this is not the time to be modest.

9. What are your weaknesses?

Another tricky one. The purpose of this question is to see how you view and evaluate yourself.

One the one hand, if you suggest you don’t have any weaknesses, your interviewer will almost certainly see you as a lair, egotistical, or both.

Don’t fall into the trap of trying to present a positive skill in disguise as a weakness, like “I work too hard” or “I am a perfectionist”. Any experienced interviewer will see through this in a heartbeat.

Additionally, revealing that “I’m not really a morning person and have been known to come in late” raises immediate and obvious red flags.

The trick here is to respond realistically by mentioning a small, work related weakness and what you are doing or have done to overcome it.

10. What do you see yourself doing in five years?

This one is all about job commitment.

Some people make job hopping a career in of itself, and your answer here can be telling. Here, your interviewer is determining if you are:

  • someone who sets goals
  • someone who has a vision
  • someone who is reliable
  • someone who demonstrates commitment
  • someone who is loyal

While no interviewer expects someone to stay at a company forever, try and craft your response in such a way that shows progression in your career, and alignment with the Company’s needs and future. Again, self awareness is key – your employer doesn’t want to send you down an unwanted path, resulting in wasted time and energy for everyone.

11. What are your salary expectations?

Many consider this question to be a loaded gun – dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced. Often times, an interviewee will start talking salary before they’ve had an opportunity to illustrate their skill set and value making any sort of leverage valueless. Here, knowledge is power, as salary often comes down to negotiation. Do some research into your industry to establish base rates of pay based on seniority and demand but keep in mind – your employer is hiring you for what they believe you are worth, and how much benefit they feel you will provide.

One relatively safe approach is simply asking the interviewer about the salary range. If you wish to avoid the question entirely, respond by saying that “money isn’t a key factor” and your primary goal is to advance in your career.

12. Do you have any questions?

This one you can almost be assured will be asked, and you better have some ready.

By asking questions you demonstrate initiative, and show that you care enough about the job to have done some research. Ask questions that focus on areas where you can be an asset. Beyond this, other questions may be more direct including productivity, expectations, training, and other logistics. All this being said, try and limit the questions to no more than three or four.

Lastly you’ll want to ask about the next step in the process and when to expect to hear about the position.

Top job interview materials:

For more details, please click links below:

1. Top 10 job interview books

2. 10 things to do after every job interview

8 bonus tips for knocking it out of the park:

1. Background Research

As indicated above, research on the company you’re applying for is critically important. Arm yourself with knowledge on the products, services, and types of customers this company deals with. You may even want to let them know who you feel their competition is! Beyond trying to make yourself look good, researching the culture of the company can provide great insights into whether or not you and your potential employer are aligned.

2. Practice makes perfect

To be certain, interviews do not always follow the same format and each interviewer will have his or her own style. That said, there are certain questions you can expect to be asked in almost any interview for any position. By understanding and practicing responses for these “oldies but goodies”, you can show up to each interview that much more confident.

3. Have some examples ready

While many candidates tell their interviewer that they posses certain desirable qualities, the proof as they say, is in the pudding. Spend some time in advance of your interview coming up with concrete examples of prior work achievements and how they demonstrate a desired ability. Be prepared for the recruiter’s questions and to anticipate them based on job position requirements. Instead of simply saying “I am well organized”, trying attaching an example or strategy. “I am a well organized person - here is an example of a project I spear-headed where organization was clutch”. Looking for the slam dunk? Finish your response with “Did that help answer your question?”.

4. Dressing for Success

First impressions can make or break so many things in society, and your interviewer’s impression of you is no exception. Whether anyone is willing to admit to it or not, the reality is you will be judged from the moment you arrive at the door. This is where some of the aforementioned research comes into play. What is the culture of the company like? Are they a highly formal suit-and-tie affair, or a casual silicon valley “hipster” organization? If you under-dress, you can appear to be too relaxed, and someone who does not appear to be taking this position seriously. However, overdressing can be perceived as over compensation. When in doubt, dress sharp, in classic business casual.

5. Play it cool

Assuming you have done some practice, you are ready to play it cool - as well you should. Make sure you’ve planned out your route well in advance, and provided ample extra time for unexpected traffic and parking issues. You should smile when greeted, and keep in mind that your interviewer may be just as nervous as you. During the interview, speak clearly and deliberately. Your body language is also important; don’t slouch back in your chair or appear “hunched over” in a defensive position. Sit tall, proud, and confident.

6. Be honest

Some candidates think using elaborate techniques to “talk around” difficult questions keeps them in the power position. A much better approach is honesty. If you are asked a question and simply don’t believe you have well developed skills in that area, don’t be afraid to let the interviewer know, rather than answering with unrelated and tangential examples. Try taking control in these situations by saying something like “While I don’t have experience in that particular area, I feel my experience in this area may be beneficial”.

7. Don’t be afraid to close the deal

Once the interview is over, the likelihood is both you and the interviewer have a good idea of where one another stand. As you stand up post interview and engage in a final handshake, be upfront. Confidence here can go a long way. If you believe you nailed the interview, be bold: “I’m going to be straight with you - I think that went really well and I think I’d be a great asset here. Where do I stand as of now?”. Alternatively, if you don’t think it went well…you probably have your answer already.

8. Be sure to ask questions

Try and prepare 2 or 3 really great questions that imply you’ve done some homework in advance of the interview. You can really impress your interviewer by asking practical questions regarding specifics about the company as well as the role itself.

Sours: https://interviewquestions247.com/2013/11/facility-coordinator-interview-questions-answers.html

Questions coordinator interview for facilities

When looking for a facility manager, questioning candidates offers the opportunity to assess whether they are competent, qualified, and experienced. To achieve this, it is vital to ask the right questions during the interview.

Other than quizzing individuals about their work experience and character, identifying the right person for the facility management job requires more targeted questions. Asking field-specific questions will allow the interviewer to gauge how much knowledge does a candidate have concerning facility management.

It is also important to have an idea of the responses to expect. In the end, the interviewer should be able to identify the most qualified candidate based on how well he or she answered the interview questions. These top 20 facility manager interview questions and answers will help you to prepare adequately for your scheduled interview.

1. What are the Roles of a Facility Manager?

The interviewer tests your understanding of the role performed by a facility manager.

Tip #1: State some roles performed by facility managers

Tip #2: Be prompt with your answer and avoid mulling

Sample Answer

A facility manager ensures effective management and maintenance of a facility. He or she makes sure that the physical infrastructure of a business is operating appropriately. Besides, he handles any emergency issues relating to the facility, formulates future facility plans including planning for repairs and replacements.

2. What Qualities Should a Facility Manager Possess?

There are certain qualities that enhance the performance of a facility manager. The interviewer seeks to know whether you are aware of such qualities.

Tip #1: Provide the qualities of a good facility manager



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Tip #2: Be brief and direct to the point

Sample Answer

A good facility manager should be able to communicate effectively with others including executives, employees, and contractors. Facility managers should be exceptionally diligent and conscientious since they are in charge of daily business operations. They should possess problem solving skills to be able to identify and solve issues before they escalate. Besides, they should have time management, negotiation, and relationship-building skills as well as be proactive thinkers.

3. How Does a Typical Day of a Facility Manager Look Like?

The interviewer wants to assess whether you are conversant with the duties and activities performed by a facility manager

Tip #1: State the tasks performed by facility managers

Tip #2: Avoid mulling over the answer to avoid being questionable

Sample Answer

A facility manager performs various tasks daily including supervising staff across various divisions, making sure facilities are repaired, conducting proactive maintenance, and providing advice on ways to enhance facilities and reduce costs. Besides, facility managers create budgets, plan about future facilities, and oversee building projects, refurbishments, and renovations.

4. As a Facility Manager, How Would You Support the Digital Workplace?

Here, the interviewer seeks to assess your understanding of the digital workplace and how you can support it.

Tip #1: Describe the way you would promote the digital workplace

Tip #2: Provide the impression that you are familiar with the digital working environment

Sample Answer

I would begin by making sure that every employee has the right digital tools to stay connected and become productive. I would also make sure the digital technologies facilitating business in the facility are running appropriately.

5. What Major Challenge Did You Encounter Lately in Your Previous Role? How Did You Address It?

Your ability to handle challenges and difficult situations is being assessed here.

Tip #1: Describe a key challenge that you faced in your last role

Tip #2: Explain how you addressed it

Sample Answer

During my last assignment, reservation of conference rooms turned out to be a big source of frustration. Customers couldn’t easily find and book available rooms. But I implemented a desk booking solution that simplified the process and made it quick and easy to know available rooms and reserve them.

6. How Do You Keep Up With The Latest Trends In Facility Management?

Every employer wants an employee who understands current trends and can bring new ideas to the organization.

Tip #1: Describe how you stay current with the latest trends in the industry

Tip #2: Be brief and go straight to the point

Sample Answer

I am a member of the International Facility Management Association and participate in local meetings and seminars where current matters in the field are discussed.

7. Why Do You Want This Job?

Here, the interviewer seeks to know how you understand the position and what appeals to you most about it.

Tip #1: Describe what appeals to you most about the job

Tip #2: Be honest with your answer

Sample Answer

What excites me about this job is that it will allow me to apply facility management skills more, learn new things, and know how to deal with more complex challenges.

8. Briefly Describe How You Have Utilized Data in Making Informed Decisions

The interviewer aims to assess your ability to gather and analyse workplace data and use it to make decisions

Tip #1: Describe how you have used collected and used data previously

Tip #2: Demonstrate how you were able to make informed decisions

Sample Answer

During my previous role, I utilized IoT Sensors to gather space utilization data. The data showed that most of the private offices were used only for a few hours a day. Consequently, the offices were converted into small conference rooms, which could be reserved when needed.

9. Why Should We Hire You for this Facility Manager Job?

Here, the interviewer wants to hear the positive attributes that make you best suited for the job.

Tip #1: Provide two or three key positive attributes that relate to the position

Tip #2: Be prompt and don’t mull about the question

Sample Answer

I am particularly dedicated to the facility management profession and can motivate my team to work productively towards a common goal. Besides, I adapt to change with ease and I learn new things quickly.

10. State Four Facility Management Technologies You are Familiar With

Exposure to facility management technologies is becoming increasingly important and that is exactly what the interviewer is assessing here.

Tip #1: State four FM technologies

Tip #2: Give the answer without mulling

Sample Answer

The FM technologies I am familiar with are:

  1. Enterprise Asset Management
  2. Computer-Aided Facilities Management
  3. Integrated Workplace Management System
  4. Computerized Maintenance Management System

11. How Often Would You Schedule Landscaping Maintenance?

The interviewer wants to know whether you understand that regular maintenance reduces hazards that may result in premises liabilities.

Tip #1: State how often you would conduct landscaping maintenance

Tip #2: Be brief and precise with your answer

Sample Answer

I would schedule landscaping maintenance and lawn care at least once every week. Besides, I would ensure to inspect the grounds regularly for potential hazards. Doing so would minimize related risks and prevent injury lawsuits.

12. As a Facility Manager, Which Types of Workers Have You Supervised?

Facility managers are involved in supervising multiple workers and the interviewer seeks to understand whether you have such an experience.

Tip #1: State the groups of workers you have supervised

Tip #2: Be honest with your answer

Sample Answer

During my last role, I supervised facility maintenance workers, custodial staff, and groundskeepers. Besides, I communicated regularly with suppliers and vendors who serviced the company equipment.

13. As a Facility Manager, How Would You Manage Natural Disaster Preparations?

Here, the interviewer seeks to know whether you understand the proper protocol for preventing natural disasters.

Tip #1: Describe how you would implement measures to prevent natural disasters

Tip #2: Demonstrate that you can effectively prepare and prevent natural disasters

Sample Answer

I would adhere to the set protocol for natural disasters based on the set regulations. Besides, I would install boundaries around the facility to lessen property damage during a disaster. Also, I would make sure all equipment is properly secured.

14. As a Facility Manager, What Processes Would You Follow for Employee Evaluation?

Facility managers assess and motivate works to maintain productivity. Thus, the interviewer seeks to know whether you are familiar with employee evaluations.

Tip #1: Describe how you would implement employee evaluations

Tip #2: Demonstrate that you are competent in this area

Sample Answer

I would conduct weekly employee evaluations to determine the strengths and shortcomings of employees. Following this, I would guide and motivate workers to improve productivity.

15. How Would You Manage Disciplinary Actions as a Facility Manager?

The interviewer wants to know whether you can be firm when it comes to correcting employee behaviour.

Tip #1: Explain how you would handle disciplinary cases

Tip #2: Demonstrate that you can correct employee behaviour

Sample Answer

I would always ensure to deal with disciplinary cases in private. I would explain the issues at hand respectfully to the concerned individual and offer advice on ways to avoid the problem in the future. Disciplinary actions would include issuing warnings to employees. If an employee is warned several times without changing his or her behaviour, I would not hesitate to recommend the expulsion of such a worker.

16. What is Your Management Style as a Facility Manager?

The interviewer is interested in knowing the style you use to manage people.

Tip #1: Describe the management style you use

Tip #2: Ensure to be clear to facilitate ease of understanding

Sample Answer

I find building a team to be an effective style in facility management. To achieve this, I make sure that each team member understands his or her role. This includes knowing where they fit well and work productively. Moreover, I believe in prompt feedback. If a worker commits a wrong, I make sure to notify them immediately to prevent further mistakes. I have discovered an increase in ineffectiveness when feedback is delayed.

17. What Have You Done Concerning Personal Development in the Past 12 Months?

The interviewer seeks to know whether you have taken any personal initiative to develop your skills concerning facility management.

Tip #1: State what you have done to enhance your skills

Tip #2: Be brief and honest with your answer

Sample Answer

I enrolled in a business administration short course at a local college. I furthered my managerial skills and gained great knowledge on teamwork and communication. I can now manage facilities and teams better.

18. How Would You Settle a Dispute Between Your Employees?

Here, the interviewer wants to assess your problem solving skills.

Tip #1: Describe how you would reconcile the workers

Tip #2: Give the impression that you are a good problem solver

Sample Answer

First, I would seek to know the main cause of the problem. I have discovered that workers may conflict when doing different works in the same location as each seeks to finish his or her job. Whatever the problem, I would then talk to the employees on what they should have done to avoid the dispute. This would help to prevent the reoccurrence of the issue in the future.

19. Describe an Instance You Made a Mistake in Your Roles and How You Handled the Situation

The interviewer wants to assess whether you own your mistakes.

Tip #1: Describe the mistake that happened

Tip #2: Show that you own your errors

Sample Answer

During my last role, while supervising the cleaning of our production facility, I failed to ensure warnings of the wet and slippery floor were put up during the cleaning process. As a result, a visitor to the office slipped and fell. He later sued the company. Following this, I owned the mistake and apologised to the executives and promised that such mistakes will not occur in the future. Besides, I developed an SOP that provided instructions about the cleaning process.

20. State Areas Where Facility Managers are Responsible for Legal Compliance

Facility management should conform to certain legal laws and the interviewer seeks to know whether you are familiar with areas that require compliance.

Tip #1: State several areas that require legal compliance

Tip #2: Give the impression that you comply with the set regulations

Sample Answer

Some areas that require legal compliance include health and safety, labour management, ethics management, and work contracts. A breach of the laws that guide the management of these areas can attract lawsuits.

Conclusion

Asking both role-specific and behavioral questions will allow you as an interviewer to assess the skilfulness of every candidate. In the end, you will be able to determine who is most qualified for the job. Thus, these top questions and answers will simplify your hiring process by enabling you to know what to ask what the responses to expect.

Sours: https://www.projectpractical.com/top-20-facility-manager-interview-questions-and-answers/
Facilities Manager Interview Questions \u0026 Answers

Eight Facilities Manager Interview Questions

By Tamara Sheehan
Director of Business Management
SpaceIQ

Looking for a new facilities manager? Quizzing candidates is your prime opportunity to gauge whether they’re qualified, competent, invested, and motivated—provided you’re asking the right facilities manager interview questions.

Beyond the usual queries about a person’s character and work experience, hiring the right facilities manager requires a few more targeted questions. Here are eight to consider when interviewing candidates:

1. What’s your experience with facilities metrics and data?

Facilities managers need to know their way around workplace data. This includes collecting, aggregating, managing, analyzing, and reporting it. Insights about cost, space utilization, and productivity will highlight how a candidate will fuel decision-making about workplace development and growth.

2. Do you have experience with workplace IoT products?

Smart offices are the way of the future. Whether you have a growing Internet of Things (IoT) or are planning a foray into smart office technologies, your new facility manager should be knowledgeable of the IoT.

Ask about the types of devices they’ve worked with and the depth of their experience. Inquire about the IoT devices or ecosystem that intrigue them and what practical utilization they see for these technologies. The more familiar they are with the office IoT, the higher on your hiring board they’ll climb.

3. What’s your familiarity with crisis management?

Facility managers should be natural leaders—individuals who can plan, delegate, and problem solve in critical situations. Ask candidates what experience they have with crisis management planning for incidents like fires, power outages, inclement weather, and active shooter situations. How do they handle plan creation and dissemination? Have they ever had to execute a plan beyond drills and, if so, what did they learn?

4. What is your approach to facility maintenance, both proactive and reactive?

This question is your opportunity to see how a candidate confronts adversity. What’s their solution to preventing common problems and staying on top of routine facility demands? How do they deal with emergent situations that require multi-step solutions?

Pay attention to answers about automation or process creation. This shows how adept candidates are at controlling problems. Put a star next to any candidate that talks about past experiences with facility issues, such as collecting bids from contractors, developing maintenance budgets, or overseeing a temporary displacement of workers.

Ideally, you’re looking for a candidate who understands the ebb and flow of facilities maintenance. Smart facilities managers know they’re charged with managing an ecosystem that needs constant oversight, not just a building.

5. Are you familiar with any FM technologies?

Having some exposure to FM technologies is increasingly important. Are candidates familiar with any of the following:

  • Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS)
  • Computer-Aided Facilities Management (CAFM)
  • Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)
  • Enterprise Asset Management (EAM)

Go even deeper. Ask how they’ve previously managed facilities data and resources like floor plans or employee directories. Gauge their willingness to learn a new system, especially if they’ll be pioneering it in your workplace. Your search should land on someone who’s familiar with FM software (learn more on selecting the best facility management software), open to learning, and adept at using tech on a growing scale.

6. What’s a facilities manager’s most important role?

This subjective question is another that’ll clue you into the mindset of a potential new FM hire. It’ll also give you some indication about how they’ll approach their work.

For example, a candidate might say “minimizing expenditures,” showing a fiscal approach to facilities management. Another might say “reducing friction among employees,” indicating an emphasis on the human element of the workplace.

There’s no wrong answer to this question, just ones that help you learn more about your candidate and their approach to the job.

7. What’s your five-year vision for this job?

If your interest is piqued by a candidate’s candor, consider this question. It’s a gateway into their logical process for the future and what they plan to contribute to your company long-term. A candidate that’s invested in the position (not just a job) will shed light on how they hope to improve your business or add value.

8. How do you believe facility management impacts company goals?

This is a great closing question. It prompts a big-picture answer about the role of facilities management in the overall success of a company. Look for answers that describe the workplace’s ability to empower employees or its relationship to company finances, both in costs and how it generates revenue. Single out candidates who recognize connections to all aspects of business and who can explain those connections clearly.

These questions are a good cross-section of purposeful inquiries designed to help you find a well-qualified candidate who’s invested in your company and the position—not just the paycheck and the title.

Keep reading: the four most important facility costs to track and manage

Tags: SiQ

Sours: https://spaceiq.com/blog/facilities-manager-interview-questions/

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