Azcopy tool

Azcopy tool DEFAULT

Get started with AzCopy

AzCopy is a command-line utility that you can use to copy blobs or files to or from a storage account. This article helps you download AzCopy, connect to your storage account, and then transfer files.

Note

AzCopy V10 is the currently supported version of AzCopy.

If you need to use a previous version of AzCopy, see the Use the previous version of AzCopy section of this article.

Download AzCopy

First, download the AzCopy V10 executable file to any directory on your computer. AzCopy V10 is just an executable file, so there's nothing to install.

These files are compressed as a zip file (Windows and Mac) or a tar file (Linux). To download and decompress the tar file on Linux, see the documentation for your Linux distribution.

Run AzCopy

For convenience, consider adding the directory location of the AzCopy executable to your system path for ease of use. That way you can type from any directory on your system.

If you choose not to add the AzCopy directory to your path, you'll have to change directories to the location of your AzCopy executable and type or in Windows PowerShell command prompts.

As an owner of your Azure Storage account, you aren't automatically assigned permissions to access data. Before you can do anything meaningful with AzCopy, you need to decide how you'll provide authorization credentials to the storage service.

Authorize AzCopy

You can provide authorization credentials by using Azure Active Directory (AD), or by using a Shared Access Signature (SAS) token.

Use this table as a guide:

Storage typeCurrently supported method of authorization
Blob storageAzure AD & SAS
Blob storage (hierarchical namespace)Azure AD & SAS
File storageSAS only

Option 1: Use Azure Active Directory

This option is available for blob Storage only. By using Azure Active Directory, you can provide credentials once instead of having to append a SAS token to each command.

Note

In the current release, if you plan to copy blobs between storage accounts, you'll have to append a SAS token to each source URL. You can omit the SAS token only from the destination URL. For examples, see Copy blobs between storage accounts.

To authorize access by using Azure AD, see Authorize access to blobs with AzCopy and Azure Active Directory (Azure AD).

Option 2: Use a SAS token

You can append a SAS token to each source or destination URL that use in your AzCopy commands.

This example command recursively copies data from a local directory to a blob container. A fictitious SAS token is appended to the end of the container URL.

To learn more about SAS tokens and how to obtain one, see Using shared access signatures (SAS).

Note

The Secure transfer required setting of a storage account determines whether the connection to a storage account is secured with Transport Layer Security (TLS). This setting is enabled by default.

Transfer data

After you've authorized your identity or obtained a SAS token, you can begin transferring data.

To find example commands, see any of these articles.

Get command help

To see a list of commands, type and then press the ENTER key.

To learn about a specific command, just include the name of the command (For example: ).

Inline help

List of commands

The following table lists all AzCopy v10 commands. Each command links to a reference article.

CommandDescription
azcopy benchRuns a performance benchmark by uploading or downloading test data to or from a specified location.
azcopy copyCopies source data to a destination location
azcopy docGenerates documentation for the tool in Markdown format.
azcopy envShows the environment variables that can configure AzCopy's behavior.
azcopy jobsSubcommands related to managing jobs.
azcopy jobs cleanRemove all log and plan files for all jobs.
azcopy jobs listDisplays information on all jobs.
azcopy jobs removeRemove all files associated with the given job ID.
azcopy jobs resumeResumes the existing job with the given job ID.
azcopy jobs showShows detailed information for the given job ID.
azcopy loadSubcommands related to transferring data in specific formats.
azcopy load clfsTransfers local data into a Container and stores it in Microsoft's Avere Cloud FileSystem (CLFS) format.
azcopy listLists the entities in a given resource.
azcopy loginLogs in to Azure Active Directory to access Azure Storage resources.
azcopy logoutLogs the user out and terminates access to Azure Storage resources.
azcopy makeCreates a container or file share.
azcopy removeDelete blobs or files from an Azure storage account.
azcopy syncReplicates the source location to the destination location.

Note

AzCopy does not have a command to rename files.

Use in a script

Obtain a static download link

Over time, the AzCopy download link will point to new versions of AzCopy. If your script downloads AzCopy, the script might stop working if a newer version of AzCopy modifies features that your script depends upon.

To avoid these issues, obtain a static (unchanging) link to the current version of AzCopy. That way, your script downloads the same exact version of AzCopy each time that it runs.

To obtain the link, run this command:

Operating systemCommand
Linux
Windows

Note

For Linux, on the command removes the top-level folder that contains the version name, and instead extracts the binary directly into the current folder. This allows the script to be updated with a new version of by only updating the URL.

The URL appears in the output of this command. Your script can then download AzCopy by using that URL.

Operating systemCommand
Linux
Windows

Escape special characters in SAS tokens

In batch files that have the extension, you'll have to escape the characters that appear in SAS tokens. You can do that by adding an additional character next to existing characters in the SAS token string.

Run scripts by using Jenkins

If you plan to use Jenkins to run scripts, make sure to place the following command at the beginning of the script.

Use in Azure Storage Explorer

Storage Explorer uses AzCopy to perform all of its data transfer operations. You can use Storage Explorer if you want to leverage the performance advantages of AzCopy, but you prefer to use a graphical user interface rather than the command line to interact with your files.

Storage Explorer uses your account key to perform operations, so after you sign into Storage Explorer, you won't need to provide additional authorization credentials.

Configure, optimize, and fix

See any of the following resources:

Use a previous version

If you need to use the previous version of AzCopy, see either of the following links:

Next steps

If you have questions, issues, or general feedback, submit them on GitHub page.

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/storage/common/storage-use-azcopy-v10

AzCopy is a command-line tool that is used to upload and download blobs/files from or to the Azure Blob Storage. In this article, I am going to explain how we can use it to create a new container on Azure blob storage and upload the data from the local machine to the Azure blob storage.

This command-line utility is not required to be installed on the workstation. You can download the appropriate executables from the below location.

The executable files are compressed in .zip (Windows) or .tar (Linux). You can download and unzip the executables. In this article, I am going to explain the following:

  1. Generate a shared access signature to connect to azure blob storage
  2. Create a container on the Azure blob storage
  3. Upload files on the container
  4. Upload the entire directory on the container
  5. Upload specific files on the container

Generate a shared access signature (SAS)

First, let us create a container on the Azure blob storage. To connect to the Azure blob storage, we must provide authorization credentials. To provide authorization credentials, you can use any of the following:

  1. Azure active directory
  2. Shared access signature token (SAS token)

In this article, I have used the shared access signature (SAS) token. To generate the SAS token, the first login to the Azure portal navigate to the storage account resource group Click on Shared access signature. See the following image:

Azure blob storage home page

On the Shared access signature page, click on “Generate SAS and connection string.” A connection string and SAS token will be generated. See the following image:

Generate a shared access signature (SAS) token

Now, to run the AzCopy command, we will use the SAS token. The SAS token will be appended at the end of the azure blob container URL (Storage account connection string). Following is the example of the blob storage URL appended with the SAS token:

“<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<container_name>?<SAS token>”

Create an Azure blob container

Using AzCopy command, I can create a BLOB container in the azure storage account. Following is the syntax:

1

Azcopy make"<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<container_name>?<SAS token>"

Example:

For example, I want to create a container named “MyFirstBLOBContainer.” To do that, execute the following command:

1

azcopy make"https://myazurestorage1987.blob.core.windows.net/myfirstBLOBcontainer?<SAS token>"

The screenshot of the command:

Container has been created on Azure blob storage

You can verify that the new container has been created in the storage account. On the Azure portal, navigate to the Azure blob storage account Open containers.

Container can be viewed on Azure blob storage

We can see in the above image, a new container named “MyFirstBLOBContainer” has been created.

Upload a file on the container

Using AzCopy, I can upload the files from the source to the destination. It supports the following directions:

  1. local machine<-> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
  2. local machine <-> Azure Files (Share/directory SAS authentication)
  3. Azure Blob (SAS or public) -> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
  4. Azure Blob (SAS or public) -> Azure Files (SAS)
  5. Azure Files (SAS) -> Azure Files (SAS)

You can read more about the copy command here.

The syntax to upload a file is following:

1

Azcopy copy" <Source File>""<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<containername>?<SAS token>"

Example:

Once the container has been created, let us upload the data to the container. I have created a CSV file named “CountryRegion.csv” in the directory “C:\CSVFiles“. I want to upload it to the BLOB container “MyFirstBLOBContainer.” As I mentioned, for authorization, we are going to use SAS. Execute the following command to upload the file:

1

azcopy copy"C:\CSVFiles\CountryRegion.csv""https://myazurestorage1987.blob.core.windows.net/myfirstblobcontainer/CountryRegion.csv?<SAS token>"

The screenshot of the command:

The file has been uploded

To view the uploaded file on the Azure portal, navigate to the Azure blob storage account Open containers open “MyFirstBLOBContainer.”

View a file in a container

As you can see in the above image, the file has been uploaded.

Upload the directory on the container

Using AzCopy command, we can upload the directory and all the files within the directory to the Azure blob storage container. The command creates a directory with the same name on the container and uploads the files.

Following is the syntax:

Azcopy copy"<directory on local computer>""<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<containername>/directoryname?<SAS token>"

--recursive

 

Instead of uploading the entire directory, if you want to upload the content of the directory, then you can specify a wildcard symbol in the command(*).

Following is the syntax:

Azcopy copy" <root directory on local computer>\* ""<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<containername>/directoryname?<SAS token>"

--recursive

 

Example:

Suppose, I want to upload a “CSVFiles” directory to the azure blob container “ MyFirstBLOBContainer.” To do that, execute the following command.

azcopy copy"C:\CSVFiles""https://myazurestorage1987.blob.core.windows.net/myfirstblobcontainer/CSVFiles?<SAS Token>"

--recursive

 

The screenshot of the command:

The directory has been uploded

A new directory named “CSVFiles” will be created on “MyFirstBLOBContainer.” You can view the files login to the Azure portal open storage account Open containers open MyFirstBLOBContainer.

Viewing the directory on the Azure blob storage container

Now, to upload all the files within the “Adventureworks2014-install-files” directory to the “Adventureworks2014” directory on the storage container, execute the following command.

1

azcopy copy"C:\Adventureworks2014-install-files\*""https://myazurestorage1987.blob.core.windows.net/myfirstblobcontainer/Adventureworks2014?<SAS Token>"

The screenshot of the command.

All files within the directory have been uploaded

To view the files, login to the Azure portal open storage account open container open Adventureworks2014 directory.

View files in Azure blob storage container

Upload specific files on the container

Using AzCopy command, we can upload specific files to the blob storage container. To do that, we must use – -include-path option and separate individual files using a semi-colon(;). Following is the syntax:

1

Azcopy copy" <directory on local computer>""<storage_account_name>.<blob>.core.windows.net/<containername>/directoryname?<SAS token>"--include-path"<file1> ; <file2> ; <file3>"

Example:

For example, I want to upload three CSV files named “ProductCategory.csv“, “Shift.csv“,” ShoppingCartItem.csv” to the “MyFirstBLOBContainer.” To do that, execute the following command.

1

azcopy copy"C:\CSVFiles""https://myazurestorage1987.blob.core.windows.net/myfirstblobcontainer?<SAS Token>"--include-path"ProductCategory.csv;Shift.csv;ShoppingCartItem.csv"

The screenshot of the command:

Specific files have been uploaded.

To view these files, login to the Azure portal open the Azure blob storage account Open containers open MyFirstBLOBContainer.

View files in Azure blob storage container

Summary

In this article, I have explained the AzCopy command and how it can be used to create new containers and upload files on the Azure Blob Storage containers.

Nisarg Upadhyay

Nisarg Upadhyay

Nisarg Upadhyay is a SQL Server Database Administrator and Microsoft certified professional who has more than 8 years of experience with SQL Server administration and 2 years with Oracle 10g database administration.

He has expertise in database design, performance tuning, backup and recovery, HA and DR setup, database migrations and upgrades. He has completed the B.Tech from Ganpat University. He can be reached on [email protected]

Nisarg Upadhyay

Latest posts by Nisarg Upadhyay (see all)

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About Nisarg Upadhyay

Nisarg Upadhyay is a SQL Server Database Administrator and Microsoft certified professional who has more than 8 years of experience with SQL Server administration and 2 years with Oracle 10g database administration. He has expertise in database design, performance tuning, backup and recovery, HA and DR setup, database migrations and upgrades. He has completed the B.Tech from Ganpat University. He can be reached on [email protected]

View all posts by Nisarg Upadhyay →

Sours: https://www.sqlshack.com/use-azcopy-to-upload-data-to-azure-blob-storage/
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  3. Available $ thinkorswim

AzCopy v10

AzCopy v10 is a command-line utility that you can use to copy data to and from containers and file shares in Azure Storage accounts. AzCopy V10 presents easy-to-use commands that are optimized for high performance and throughput.

Features and capabilities

Use with storage accounts that have a hierarchical namespace (Azure Data Lake Storage Gen2).

Create containers and file shares.

Upload files and directories.

Download files and directories.

Copy containers, directories and blobs between storage accounts (Service to Service).

Synchronize data between Local <=> Blob Storage, Blob Storage <=> File Storage, and Local <=> File Storage.

Delete blobs or files from an Azure storage account

Copy objects, directories, and buckets from Amazon Web Services (AWS) to Azure Blob Storage (Blobs only).

Copy objects, directories, and buckets from Google Cloud Platform (GCP) to Azure Blob Storage (Blobs only).

List files in a container.

Recover from failures by restarting previous jobs.

Download AzCopy

The latest binary for AzCopy along with installation instructions may be found here.

Find help

For complete guidance, visit any of these articles on the docs.microsoft.com website.

Get started with AzCopy (download links here)

Upload files to Azure Blob storage by using AzCopy

Download blobs from Azure Blob storage by using AzCopy

Copy blobs between Azure storage accounts by using AzCopy

Synchronize between Local File System/Azure Blob Storage (Gen1)/Azure File Storage by using AzCopy

Transfer data with AzCopy and file storage

Transfer data with AzCopy and Amazon S3 buckets

Transfer data with AzCopy and Google GCP buckets

Use data transfer tools in Azure Stack Hub Storage

Configure, optimize, and troubleshoot AzCopy

AzCopy WiKi

Supported Operations

The general format of the AzCopy commands is:

  • - Runs a performance benchmark by uploading or downloading test data to or from a specified destination

  • - Copies source data to a destination location. The supported directions are:

    • Local File System <-> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
    • Local File System <-> Azure Files (Share/directory SAS authentication)
    • Local File System <-> Azure Data Lake Storage (ADLS Gen2) (SAS, OAuth, or SharedKey authentication)
    • Azure Blob (SAS or public) -> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
    • Azure Blob (SAS or public) -> Azure Files (SAS)
    • Azure Files (SAS) -> Azure Files (SAS)
    • Azure Files (SAS) -> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
    • AWS S3 (Access Key) -> Azure Block Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
    • Google Cloud Storage (Service Account Key) -> Azure Block Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication) [Preview]
  • - Replicate source to the destination location. The supported directions are:

    • Local File System <-> Azure Blob (SAS or OAuth authentication)
    • Local File System <-> Azure Files (Share/directory SAS authentication)
    • Azure Blob (SAS or public) -> Azure Files (SAS)
  • - Log in to Azure Active Directory (AD) to access Azure Storage resources.

  • - Log out to terminate access to Azure Storage resources.

  • - List the entities in a given resource

  • - Generates documentation for the tool in Markdown format

  • - Shows the environment variables that you can use to configure the behavior of AzCopy.

  • - Help about any command

  • - Sub-commands related to managing jobs

  • - Sub-commands related to transferring data in specific formats

  • - Create a container or file share.

  • - Delete blobs or files from an Azure storage account

Find help from your command prompt

For convenience, consider adding the AzCopy directory location to your system path for ease of use. That way you can type from any directory on your system.

To see a list of commands, type and then press the ENTER key.

To learn about a specific command, just include the name of the command (For example: ).

AzCopy command help example

If you choose not to add AzCopy to your path, you'll have to change directories to the location of your AzCopy executable and type or in Windows PowerShell command prompts.

Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between and ?

  • The command is a simple transferring operation. It scans/enumerates the source and attempts to transfer every single file/blob present on the source to the destination. The supported source/destination pairs are listed in the help message of the tool.

  • On the other hand, scans/enumerates both the source, and the destination to find the incremental change. It makes sure that whatever is present in the source will be replicated to the destination. For ,

  • If your goal is to simply move some files, then is definitely the right command, since it offers much better performance. If the use case is to incrementally transfer data (files present only on source) then is the better choice, since only the modified/missing files will be transferred. Since enumerates both source and destination to find the incremental change, it is relatively slower as compared to

Will overwrite my files?

By default, AzCopy will overwrite the files at the destination if they already exist. To avoid this behavior, please use the flag .

Will overwrite my files?

By default, AzCopy use last-modified-time to determine whether to transfer the same file present at both the source, and the destination. i.e, If the source file is newer compared to the destination file, we overwrite the destination You can change this default behaviour and overwrite files at the destination by using the flag

Will 'sync' delete files in the destination if they no longer exist in the source location?

By default, the 'sync' command doesn't delete files in the destination unless you use an optional flag with the command. To learn more, see Synchronize files.

How to contribute to AzCopy v10

This project welcomes contributions and suggestions. Most contributions require you to agree to a Contributor License Agreement (CLA) declaring that you have the right to, and actually do, grant us the rights to use your contribution. For details, visit https://cla.microsoft.com.

When you submit a pull request, a CLA-bot will automatically determine whether you need to provide a CLA and decorate the PR appropriately (e.g., label, comment). Simply follow the instructions provided by the bot. You will only need to do this once across all repos using our CLA.

This project has adopted the Microsoft Open Source Code of Conduct. For more information see the Code of Conduct FAQ or contact [email protected] with any additional questions or comments.

Sours: https://github.com/Azure/azure-storage-azcopy
Synchronize Files to Azure Blob Storage with AZCopy

Adam the Automator

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The AzCopy tool is a free and handy tool that allows you to copy and move data to and from Azure storage. It’s a great command-line utility that can automate and streamline the process but requires some setup.

In this article, you’re going to learn how to prepare your system to use AzCopy. This includes downloading and authenticating the tool to have access to Azure storage. By the time you’re through, you’ll be ready to use AzCopy to manage Azure storage data.

The latest and supported version of AzCopy as of this writing is AzCopy v10. AzCopy is available for Windows, Linux, and macOS. In this article, only the Windows AzCopy utility is covered.

Prerequisites

You’ll learn hands-on how to perform a few different tasks in this article. If you’d like to follow along, be sure you have the following prerequisites met.

Downloading AzCopy: The Manual Way

There are a couple different to download AzCopy. Let’s first do it the manual way. You might use this method if you don’t intend to install AzCopy on many computers at once.

Navigate to this URL – https://aka.ms/downloadazcopy-v10-windows and it should initiate a download of the zip file. Once downloaded, extract the zip file to the C:\AzCopy or a folder of your choice.

Lastly, add the installation directory to the system path. Refer to the article How to set the path and environment variables in Windows if you need to know how to do that. Adding the folder path to the Windows PATH allows you to call the azcopy executable whenever you are in any working directory at the command line.

Downloading AzCopy via PowerShell Script

If you intend to install AzCopy on many machines or simply need to provide instructions for someone else to install it, you can use PowerShell also. Using a PowerShell script simplifies the process down to a single script.

Create a new PowerShell script and copy/paste the below contents into it. You can get an idea of which each section of the script is doing by inspecting the in-line comments.

By default, the below script will place AzCopy in the C:\AzCopy folder. If you’d like to change that, when running the script, use the parameter or simply change the default path in the script itself.

Once the script has run, you can then confirm that AzCopy was downloaded successfully. While still in the PowerShell console, listing the files in the install path by running replacing whatever folder you used.

If everything went well, you should see the azcopy.exe utility and a license text file.

You can also confirm that the installation path is added to the system path variable by running and noticing that the install folder shows up at the bottom of the list.

In the example below, is listed which means that the location was added successfully.

List the system path values

Authenticating AzCopy

AzCopy should now be downloaded to your computer. But before you can perform any tasks, it is necessary to authenticate to your Azure subscription to access Azure Storage first.

There are two ways to authenticate AzCopy to your Azure storage accounts – Azure Active Directory or by a Shared Access Signature (SAS) token. In this article, we’ll focus on using Azure AD. If you’d like to learn how to create a SAS token to authenticate that way, check out How to Generate an Azure SAS Token to Access Storage Accounts.

The most common method to authenticate AzCopy is via Azure AD. When using Azure AD, you have several options. Some of these options are:

  • Interactive Login – User is prompted to log in using the browser.
  • Service Principal + password – For non-interactive login. Recommended for automation and scripting.
  • Service Principal + certificate – For non-interactive login. Recommended for automation and scripting.

In this article, you will learn how to authenticate via interactive login. To do so, first, open a command prompt or PowerShell and run the below command. The parameter is optional but recommended, especially if your login account is associated with more than one Azure tenant.

If you need help finding your Azure AD tenant ID, check out, this article.

Once executed, you will be asked to open a browser and navigate to https://microsoft.com/devicelogin and enter the displayed code. You can see what that will look like below.

Enter the code from AzCopy into the browser

Once you’ve entered the code into the browser, click Next and proceed to sign in to your account.

Sign in to Azure AD

When sign-in is done, you should see the status shown in the browser and in the terminal similar to what’s shown in the screenshot below.

AzCopy login is successful

Summary

In the end, you now have the needed knowledge on how to download and authenticate AzCopy on your machine.

Now that you have all this knowledge, you should now be ready to put AzCopy in action! If you’d like to take AzCopy for a spin, head over to the next article How To Manage Files Between Local And Azure Storage With AZCopy to learn how to use AzCopy to manage and transfer data between local and Azure storage.

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Sours: https://adamtheautomator.com/azcopy-download/

Tool azcopy

azcopy

  • 2 minutes to read

AzCopy is a command-line tool that moves data into and out of Azure Storage. See the Get started with AzCopy article to download AzCopy and learn about the ways that you can provide authorization credentials to the storage service.

Synopsis

The general format of the commands is: .

To report issues or to learn more about the tool, see https://github.com/Azure/azure-storage-azcopy.

Related conceptual articles

Options

--cap-mbps (float) Caps the transfer rate, in megabits per second. Moment-by-moment throughput might vary slightly from the cap. If this option is set to zero, or it is omitted, the throughput isn't capped.

--help Help for azcopy

--output-type (string) Format of the command's output. The choices include: text, json. The default value is . (default )

--trusted-microsoft-suffixes (string) Specifies additional domain suffixes where Azure Active Directory login tokens may be sent. The default is '.core.windows.net;.core.chinacloudapi.cn;.core.cloudapi.de;.core.usgovcloudapi.net'. Any listed here are added to the default. For security, you should only put Microsoft Azure domains here. Separate multiple entries with semi-colons.

See also

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/storage/common/storage-ref-azcopy
How to install and use Azcopy?

How to Upload Files to Azure Blob Storage with AzCopy, PowerShell, and More

Migrating data from an existing repository to Azure Blob and keeping data in sync in hybrid deployments can both be significant hurdles in many organizations’ cloud journeys. There are several Azure-native and third-party tools and services to help migrate data to Azure, the most popular ones being AzCopy, Azure Import/Export, Azure Powershell, and Azure Data Box. How can you know which is the right choice for your Azure migration?

Selecting the right tools is dependent on several factors, including timelines for migration, data size, network bandwidth availability, online/offline migration requirements, and more. This blog will share and explore some of these Azure migration tools and the simple steps on how to easily migrate files to Azure Blob storage, all of which can be enhanced with the help of NetApp Cloud Volumes ONTAP’s advanced data management capabilities for data migration, performance, and protection in Azure Blob storage.

Click ahead for more on:

Tools to Upload Data to Azure Blob Storage

With data migration and mobility being critical components of cloud adoption, Microsoft offers multiple native tools and services to support customers with these processes. Let’s explore some of these tools in detail.

AzCopy is a command-line utility used to transfer data to and from Azure storage. It is a lightweight tool that can be installed on your Windows, Linux, or Mac machines to initiate the data transfer to Azure. AzCopy can be used in a number of scenarios, for transferring data from on-premises to Azure Blob and Azure Files or from Amazon S3 to Azure storage. The tool can also be used for data copy to or from Azure Stack as well.

Click to learn How to Upload Data to Azure Using AzCopy

Azure PowerShell is another command line option for transferring data from on-premises to Azure Blob storage. The Azure PowerShell command Set-AzStorageBlobContent can be used to copy data to Azure blob storage.

Click ahead for Azure PowerShell and How to Use It

Azure Import/Export is a physical transfer method used in large data transfer scenarios where the data needs to be imported to or exported from Azure Blob storage or Azure Files In addition to large scale data transfers, this solution can also be used for use cases like content distribution and data backup/restore. Data is shipped to Azure data centers in customer-supplied SSDs or HDDs.

Azure Data Box uses a proprietary Data Box storage device provided by Microsoft to transfer data into and out of Azure data centers. The service is recommended in scenarios where the data size is above 40 TB and there is limited bandwidth to transfer data over the network. The most popular use cases are one-time bulk migration of data, initial data transfers to Azure followed by incremental transfers over the network, as well as for periodic upload of bulk data.

How to Upload Files to Azure Blob Storage Using AzCopy

AzCopy is available for Windows, Linux, and MacOS systems. There is no installation involved as AzCopy runs as an executable file. The zip file for Windows and Linux needs to be downloaded and extracted to run the tool. For Linux, the tar file has to be downloaded and decompressed before running the commands.

The AzCopy tool can be authorized to access Azure Blob storage either using Azure AD or a SAS token. While using Azure AD authentication, customers can choose to authenticate with a user account before initiating the data copy. While using automation scripts, Azure AD authentication can be achieved using a service principal or managed identity.

In this walkthrough of AzCopy we will be using authentication through an Azure AD user account. The account should be assigned either the storage blob data contributor or the Storage Blob Data Owner role in the storage container where the data is to be copied, as well as in the storage account, resource group, and subscription to be used.

 1. Browse to the folder where AzCopy is downloaded and run the following command to login:

copy files 1

You will now see details about how to log in to https://microsoft.com/devicelogin. Follow the instructions in the output and use the code provided to authenticate.

 2. On the login page, enter your Azure credentials with access to the storage and click on “Next.”

Enter you Azure Credentials

3. Back in the command line, you will receive a “login succeeded” message.
Login succeeded message

  1. Execute the following AzCopy command to create a container in the storage account to upload files:

Update the <Azure storage account name> placeholder with name of the storage account in Azure and <container> with the name of the container you want to create. Below, you can see a sample command:

Execute the AzCopy command

  1. To copy a file from your local machine to Storage account

Update the <Local of file in local disk> and <Azure storage account name> placeholders in the above command to reflect values of your environment, and <container> with the name of the storage container you created in step 4.

Sample command given below:

Note: In the above example folder1 in the above command is the container that was created in step 4.

Copy a file from your local machine to Storage account

Upon successful completion of the command, the job status will be shown as Completed.

  1. To copy all files from a local folder to the Azure storage container run the following command:

Update the <Location of folder in local disk>, <Azure storage account name>, and <container> placeholders in the above command to reflect values of your environment. Sample command given below:

Your source folder content will appear as below:

Source folder content

  1. If you browse to the Storage account in the Azure portal, you can see that the folder has been created inside the Azure storage container and that the files are copied inside the folder.

The folder has been created inside the Azure storage container

  1. To copy contents of the local folder without creating a new folder in Azure storage, you can use the following command:

Sample command given below:

Use the command above

  1. The additional files are copied from the local folder named folder2 to the Azure container folder1, as shown below. Note that the source folder is not created in this case.

Additional files are copied from the local folder

What Is Azure PowerShell and How to Use It

Azure PowerShell cmdlets can be used to manage Azure resources from PowerShell command and scripts. In addition to AzCopy, Powershell can also be used to upload files from a local folder to Azure storage. The Azure PowerShell command Set-AzStorageBlobContent is used for the same purpose.

File Transfers to Azure Blob Storage Using Azure PowerShell

In this section we will look into the commands that can be used to upload files to Azure blob storage using PowerShell from a Windows machine.

 1. Install the latest version of Azure PowerShell for all users on the system in a PowerShell session opened with administrator rights using the following command:

Select “Yes” when prompted for permissions to install packages.

Click 'yes' to install packages

2. Use the following command and sign-in to your Azure subscription when prompted:

Azure sign in

  1. Get the storage account context to be used for the data transfer using the following commands:

Update the place holders <resource group name> and <storage account name> with values specific to your environment, as in the sample command given below:

Update the <resource group name> and <storage account name> values

  1. Run the following command to upload a file from your local directory to a container in Azure storage:

Replace the placeholders <storage container name> and <Location of file in local disk> with values specific to your environment. Sample given below:

Once the file is uploaded successfully, you will get a message similar to what you can see in the screenshot below:

File upload confirmation message

  1. To upload all files in the current folder, run the following command

Sample command given below:

Run the command above to upload all files in the current folder

  1. If you browse to the Azure storage container, you will see all the files uploaded in steps 4 and 5.

Copy Files

NetApp Cloud Volumes ONTAP: Accelerate Cloud Data Migration

We have discussed how data migration to Azure can be easily achieved using AzCopy and Azure PowerShell commands. Customers can also leverage NetApp Cloud Volumes ONTAP for data migration to the cloud through trusted NetApp replication and cloning technology. Cloud Volumes ONTAP delivers a hybrid data management solution, spanning on-premises as well as multiple cloud environments.

Cloud Volumes ONTAP is distinguished by the value it provides to its customers through high availability, data protection, and storage efficiency features such as deduplication, compression and thin provisioning. Cloud Volumes ONTAP volumes can be accessed by virtual machines in Azure over SMB/NFS protocols and helps in achieving unparalleled storage economy through these features. As the storage is being used more efficiently, Azure storage cost is also reduced considerably.

NetApp Snapshot™ technology along with SnapMirror® data replication can ease up the data migration from on-premises environments to the cloud. While SnapShot technology can be used to take Point-in-time backup copies of data from on-premises NetApp storage, SnapMirror data replications helps to replicate them to Cloud Volumes ONTAP volumes in Azure. The service can also be used to keep data between on-premises and cloud environments in sync for DR purposes.

NetApp FlexClone® data cloning technology helps in creating storage efficient writable clones of on-premises volumes that can be integrated into CI/CD processes to deploy test/dev environments in the cloud. This enhances data portability from on-premises to cloud and also within the cloud, which can all be managed from a unified management pain. Thus, Cloud Volumes ONTAP helps organizations achieve agility and faster time to market for their applications.

Another NetApp data migration service is Cloud Sync, which can quickly and efficiently migrate data from any repository to object-based storage in the cloud, whether it’s from an on-prem system or between clouds.

Conclusion

Customers can choose from native tools like AzCopy and Azure PowerShell to upload files to Azure Blob Storage. They can also leverage Cloud Volumes ONTAP for advanced data management and migration capabilities using features like SnapMirror replication, NetApp Snapshots and FlexClone.

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Sours: https://cloud.netapp.com/blog/azure-cvo-blg-how-to-upload-files-to-azure-blob-storage

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