Ripped off meaning in english

Ripped off meaning in english DEFAULT

rip off

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Verb1.rip off - deprive somebody of something by deceit; "The con-man beat me out of $50"; "This salesman ripped us off!"; "we were cheated by their clever-sounding scheme"; "They chiseled me out of my money"

cheat, chisel

gazump - raise the price of something after agreeing on a lower price

cozen - cheat or trick; "He cozened the money out of the old man"

fleece, gazump, overcharge, plume, rob, soak, surcharge, hook, pluck - rip off; ask an unreasonable price

bunco, con, defraud, diddle, goldbrick, hornswoggle, mulct, nobble, rook, scam, swindle, short-change, victimize - deprive of by deceit; "He swindled me out of my inheritance"; "She defrauded the customers who trusted her"; "the cashier gypped me when he gave me too little change"

bilk - cheat somebody out of what is due, especially money

bunk, beat - avoid paying; "beat the subway fare"

whipsaw - victimize, especially in gambling or negotiations

welch, welsh - cheat by avoiding payment of a gambling debt

victimise, victimize - make a victim of; "I was victimized by this con-man"

beguile, hoodwink, juggle - influence by slyness

Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

rip

verb
2. Informal. To move swiftly:

bolt, bucket, bustle, dart, dash, festinate, flash, fleet, flit, fly, haste, hasten, hurry, hustle, pelt, race, rocket, run, rush, sail, scoot, scour, shoot, speed, sprint, tear, trot, whirl, whisk, whiz, wing, zip, zoom.

Informal: hotfoot.

Slang: barrel, highball.

Chiefly British: nip.

Idioms: get a move on, get cracking, go like lightning, go like the wind, hotfoot it, make haste, make time, make tracks, run like the wind, shake a leg, step on it.

phrasal verb
rip into
To criticize harshly and devastatingly:

blister, drub, excoriate, flay, lash, scarify, scathe, scorch, score, scourge, slap, slash.

Informal: roast.

Slang: slam.

Idioms: burn someone's ears, crawl all over, pin someone's ears back, put someone on the griddle, put someone on the hot seat, rake over the coals, read the riot act to.

phrasal verb
rip off
1. Slang. To take (another's property) without permission:

filch, pilfer, purloin, snatch, steal, thieve.

Informal: lift, swipe.

Slang: cop, heist, hook, nip, pinch, snitch.

Idiom: make off with.

2. Slang. To exploit (another) by charging too much for something:

fleece, overcharge.

Slang: clip, gouge, nick, scalp, skin, soak.

Idioms: make someone pay through the nose, take someone for a ride , take someone to the cleaners .

noun

The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sours: //www.thefreedictionary.com/

rip somebody/something ↔ off

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishrip somebody/something ↔ off phrasal verb informal1BBTEXPENSIVEto charge someone too much money for somethingSYN overchargeThe agency really ripped us off.2SCCSTEALto steal somethingSomebody had come in and ripped off the TV and stereo.3to take words, ideas etc from someone else’s work and use them in your own work as if they were your own ideasSYN plagiarize →rip-off(2) →rip→ See Verb tableExamples from the Corpusrip off• Dealers may like people to take E, but this doesn't stop them ripping the users off.• It occurred to Hicks that there would be absolutely nothing dishonorable in ripping him off.• Most men I know would be ripping my clothes off by now.• I felt him rip the tape off my hands, but he kept my left arm in a hammerlock.• When you rip the cloth off the umbrella, is the umbrella still an umbrella?• The husband tried to seize a portrait of her, an oilpainting, rip it right off the wall.• I crushed up the cockroach in my clothes and practically ripped my blouse off, there in open sunlight.• But the waves surging across the raft had ripped the lids off three of the four tubs.rip-offˈrip-off noun [countable]1informalEXPENSIVE something that is unreasonably expensiveThe meal was a rip-off and the service was appalling.2music, art, films etc that are rip-offscopy something else without admitting that they are copiesrip-off ofa rip-off of a hit movie →rip off1Examples from the Corpusrip-off• Would a flattaxsavetaxpayers money and time, or is it a rip-off that would help only the rich?• It was an electronicpianokeyboard, a rip-off of the Yamaha instrument that was a big Christmas seller in the States.• It's still a rip-off and anyway, what does he think it will pay for?• We shouldn't have gone there - it was such a rip-off.• Makes this other offer of a chance to win $ 100 look like a cheaprip-off.• Last year, 114 cases with 236 victims and more than $ 18 million in estimatedrip-offs led to 11 criminalconvictions.• This band is nothing but a PearlJamrip-off, with no original sound of its own.• Other rip-offs in the past have centred on everything from goldbullion to currencytrading.• Unless there are safeguards in the Bill, there will be assetstripping and propertyrip-offs on a grandscale.• I've seen the movie, plus all the rip-offs and sequels.From Longman Business Dictionaryrip somebody → off phrasal verb [transitive] informalto charge someone too much money for something, or sell someone a product that is faultyWe all hate being ripped off. →rip→ See Verb tablerip-offˈrip-off noun [countable] informal1something that is unreasonably expensiveThe survey found that most dieters thought diet programs were a big rip-off.2something that is a copy of something elseThe high street stores are selling cheap rip-offs of his designs.

Sours: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/rip-off
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rip-off

Sours: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rip-off
Rip Off Rip Up Rip Into Rip Through - Phrasal Verbs - Rip Off Meaning - Rip Up Examples - Phrasals

ripoff

or rip-off

[ rip-awf, -of ]

/ ˈrɪpˌɔf, -ˌɒf /


nounSlang.

an act or instance of ripping off another or others; a theft, cheat, or swindle.

exploitation, especially of those who cannot prevent or counter it.

a copy or imitation.

a person who rips off another or others; thief or swindler.

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Origin of ripoff

First recorded in 1965–70; noun use of verb phrase rip off

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Words related to ripoff

swindle, fraud, deception, blackmail, hoax, deceit, shakedown, racket, extortion, rip-off, sham, scam, vandalism, piracy, heist, holdup, crime, embezzlement, larceny, thievery

How to use ripoff in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for ripoff


verb

(tr)to tear violently or roughly (from)

(adverb)slangto steal from or cheat (someone)

nounrip-off

slangan article or articles stolen

slanga grossly overpriced article

slangthe act of stealing or cheating

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with ripoff


1

Steal, as in They fired him when they caught him ripping off some of the merchandise.

2

Cheat, defraud, as in These advertising claims have ripped off a great many consumers.

3

Copy, plagiarize, as in He was sued for ripping off someone else's thesis. All three usages are slang from the second half of the 1900s.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Sours: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/rip--off

Off meaning english ripped in

rip

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Noun1.rip - a dissolute man in fashionable societyrip - a dissolute man in fashionable society

profligate, rake, rakehell, roue, blood

debauchee, libertine, rounder - a dissolute person; usually a man who is morally unrestrained

2.rip - an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants"; "she had snags in her stockings"

rent, tear, snag, split

opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"

3.rip - a stretch of turbulent water in a river or the sea caused by one current flowing into or across another current

countercurrent, crosscurrent, riptide, tide rip

turbulence, turbulency - unstable flow of a liquid or gas

4.rip - the act of rending or ripping or splitting something; "he gave the envelope a vigorous rip"

rent, split

tear - the act of tearing; "he took the manuscript in both hands and gave it a mighty tear"

Verb1.rip - tear or be torn violently; "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"; "pull the cooked chicken into strips"

rend, rive, pull

rupture, tear, snap, bust - separate or cause to separate abruptly; "The rope snapped"; "tear the paper"

2.rip - move precipitously or violently; "The tornado ripped along the coast"

shoot down, tear, buck, charge, shoot - move quickly and violently; "The car tore down the street"; "He came charging into my office"

3.rip - cut (wood) along the grain

cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"

4.rip - criticize or abuse strongly and violently; "The candidate ripped into his opponent mercilessly"

lash out, attack, snipe, assail, assault, round - attack in speech or writing; "The editors of the left-leaning paper attacked the new House Speaker"

Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

rip

verb

1.tear, cut, score, split, burst, rend, slash, hack, claw, slit, gash, lacerateI tried not to rip the paper.

2.be torn, tear, split, burst, be rentI felt the banner rip as we were pushed in opposite directions.

noun

1.tear, cut, hole, split, rent, slash, slit, cleavage, gash, lacerationShe looked at the rip in her new dress.

rip someone off(Slang)cheat, trick, rob, con(informal), skin(slang), stiff(slang), steal from, fleece, defraud, dupe, swindle, diddle(informal), do the dirty on(Brit. informal), gyp(slang), cozenTicket touts ripped them off.

rip something off(Slang)steal, pinch(informal), swipe(slang), thieve, lift(informal), trouser(slang), cabbage(Brit. slang), knock off(slang), pilfer, filchHe ripped off a camera and a Game Boy.

rip something or someone apartcriticize, condemn, censure, disparage, knock(informal), blast, pan(informal), slam(slang), flame(informal), carp, put down, slate(informal), have a go (at)(informal), disapprove of, tear into(informal), diss(slang, chiefly U.S.), find fault with, nag at, lambast(e), pick holes in, excoriate, pick to pieces, give (someone or something) a bad press, animadvert on or upon, pass strictures uponThe audience ripped her apart.

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

rip

verb
2. Informal. To move swiftly:

bolt, bucket, bustle, dart, dash, festinate, flash, fleet, flit, fly, haste, hasten, hurry, hustle, pelt, race, rocket, run, rush, sail, scoot, scour, shoot, speed, sprint, tear, trot, whirl, whisk, whiz, wing, zip, zoom.

Informal: hotfoot.

Slang: barrel, highball.

Chiefly British: nip.

Idioms: get a move on, get cracking, go like lightning, go like the wind, hotfoot it, make haste, make time, make tracks, run like the wind, shake a leg, step on it.

phrasal verb
rip into
To criticize harshly and devastatingly:

blister, drub, excoriate, flay, lash, scarify, scathe, scorch, score, scourge, slap, slash.

Informal: roast.

Slang: slam.

Idioms: burn someone's ears, crawl all over, pin someone's ears back, put someone on the griddle, put someone on the hot seat, rake over the coals, read the riot act to.

phrasal verb
rip off
1. Slang. To take (another's property) without permission:

filch, pilfer, purloin, snatch, steal, thieve.

Informal: lift, swipe.

Slang: cop, heist, hook, nip, pinch, snitch.

Idiom: make off with.

2. Slang. To exploit (another) by charging too much for something:

fleece, overcharge.

Slang: clip, gouge, nick, scalp, skin, soak.

Idioms: make someone pay through the nose, take someone for a ride , take someone to the cleaners .

noun

The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sours: //www.thefreedictionary.com/
Phrasal Verb Daily 70: \

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