Serato vinyl scratch

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Free Shipping - No Hassle Returns - 30 Day Trial Period

At Music Store Live, we are proud to offer free shipping on just about everything we sell. We’ve also got one of the best return policies in the business giving you a full 30 day trial period that starts when you receive your order for all new* items. It's all part of our mission to bring the guitar shop to your living room. This policy allows you to get your gear hassle-free and try it with your own rig to be sure that it truly fits with your playing style and sound. If it doesn't work the way you had hoped, we’ll provide you with return authorization information to send it back for an exchange, a refund, or in-store credit. But no matter what, we’ve got your back and we are here to help make sure you end up with the right gear for you. You’ll never be stuck with something you aren’t happy with.

Return Policy Details

What if there’s something defective with the item I purchased or it arrived with shipping damage?

We’ve got some of the best guitar techs around to test out every instrument before it leaves our shop and give everything a full setup. We’re confident your order will arrive ready to rock right out of the box. Our awesome warehouse staff put time and care into packaging your order up to make sure it all arrives to you safely. But let’s be honest, once in a blue moon stuff happens that’s out of anyone’s control. If you received an item which you believe is faulty, shows signs of shipping damage, or in any way doesn’t meet your expectations based on the description in the listing, please do not hesitate to contact one of our Gear Experts. No matter what happens, we want to make it right! (note: If you believe there to be shipping damage, please do not discard the packaging that your order came in and please make sure to contact us within 24 hours of receiving your delivery)

What if I’m not liking it or it’s just not working out for me?

Is something you purchased from us just not doing it for you? We understand and we absolutely want you to be thrilled with any gear that you buy from Music Store Live. If you're not happy with your order, you can return it to us within 30 days of delivery*. You are welcome to return it for a refund, an exchange, or in-store credit.

  • Please allow 2-4 business days from the receiving date for returns to be processed.
  • If your purchase qualified for free shipping, we may withhold our outbound shipping costs from any refunds processed as part of the return.
  • Contact MSL at [email protected] or call (866) 256-5725 to begin the return process. Anything sent back to us must have an RMA number and we may refuse returns that did not receive prior authorization.
  • Return the item(s) in its original packaging and in a way that will help ensure its safe arrival back to us.
  • Just as we’re responsible for getting your order to you safely, you are responsible for returning the item(s) to Music Store Live in its original condition. Please take care with packaging it back up and preparing it for the return shipping journey. We recommend you add insurance to higher value items when sending them back.
  • All returns will go through a technical inspection and are subject to a restocking fee if the item is not returned in its original condition. Restocking fee to be determined by MSL but is not to exceed 15% under typical circumstances.
  • * B-Stock, C-Stock, E-Stock, Open Box, and Used items are subject to a 7-day trial period.

Is there anything that you guys won’t take back or that does not apply to your return policy?

We definitely want to work with you and be as flexible as we can to earn your business and to make sure you’re happy with everything you purchase from us. Unfortunately, there are some things that we simply cannot take back once it’s sold. That includes:

  • Custom orders or instruments with modifications (pickup installs, straplock installs, tuner installs, etc)
  • Software or authorization keys
  • Guitar amp tubes or cabinet speakers
  • Pickups that have been installed
  • Strings that have been installed
  • Drum heads and cymbals that show signs of use
  • Personal items (earphones, harmonicas, instrument mouthpieces, etc.)
  • Turntable cartridges
  • Styli
  • Control vinyl

When sending back a return, please make sure that the return merchandise authorization number (RMA) provided by one of our Gear Experts is clearly written on the label of your return. To help avoid any restocking fees, please don’t write anything on the packaging. Please return all of the original packaging and its contents. We must receive the item/order back in a condition that allows us to resell it in the same condition it was originally in when we sent it out. 

Your return label should look something like this:
Music Store Live
Attn: RMA XXXXX
300 W. 28th St, ste 102
National City, CA 91950

(Note: Purchases made through third party marketplaces such as eBay, Reverb, or Amazon have their own policies and criteria for returns. Please ask if you have any questions regarding that process.)

Shipping Policy Details

In most cases we ship new orders out within 1 business day of receiving payment. Here are some things to note:

  • An indirect signature will be required upon delivery for all transactions over $250. If you would like to require a signature on a transaction of less than $250, please request it when you place your order.
  • Your order must ship to the billing address associated with your credit card, PayPal, or other method of payment. If you need to use a shipping address that differs from your billing address, feel free to contact a Music Store Live Gear Expert and we can help you out.
  • If you want the shipment to be held at a shipping company hub it is your responsibility to make those arrangements directly with the shipping company. If you’d like it held at a local FedEx facility, for example, please provide us with the full address of that facility before your order is shipped. This works out better than trying to re-route it once it’s in transit.
  • We do not insure packages valued under $3,000. If you would like to add insurance for delivery please request it when requesting your order. Whether you choose to or not, we will still assume all of the responsibility in getting your item to you safely.
  • Orders shipped within California will be subject to 7.25% state sales tax.
Sours: https://musicstorelive.com/rane-serato-dj-scratch-live-time-code-control-vinyl-v-2-5-clear.html

DJ A-Trak Explains How Serato Works

DJ A-Trak, a.k.a. Alain Macklovitch, demonstrates how Serato's Scratch Live software imitates playing music from records. Jacob Ganz hide caption

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Jacob Ganz

This week we talked to a bunch of people about how vinyl has managed to survive, despite the fact that, technologically speaking, the format is something of an antique. One key group that helped vinyl stay alive once the public began to abandon it in favor of the CD was DJs who would spin vinyl in clubs and on the radio. But in the last decade, while younger audiences — especially indie rock fans — have started buying new music on vinyl, those DJs have largely traded in their crates of records for digital files they play through vinyl emulation software like Scratch Live, made by the New Zealand-based company Serato.

The story of Serato (and other vinyl emulation programs, like Traktor) is the story of how the leading edge of innovation always has to contend with both the practical limits of technology and the emotional and physical pull of tradition. And there's almost no one in the world better equipped to tell that story than Alain Macklovitch, the Montreal-born, Brooklyn-based DJ, producer and record label owner better known as A-Trak. Macklovitch's career has overlapped the transition from vinyl to digital DJing at every turn. He began his musical career with as close a relationship to vinyl as you can get: from the age of 12 he was a turntablist, a DJ who spins, mixes and manipulates vinyl records to produce new sounds. At 15, he was the DMC DJ world champion.

YouTube

Macklovitch's youth is important for reasons beyond the fact that it made him a prodigy as a DJ. Born in 1982, by the time he was 20 years old software companies were already starting to introduce programs that would (theoretically) allow DJs to manipulate mp3s the way they had always messed around with records. He was the first DJ outside of New Zealand to test Serato's software. He spent four years as Kanye West's touring DJ, and helped demonstrate that vinyl emulation software could offer hip-hop shows the flexibility of vinyl with the convenience and sturdiness of developing digital formats.

For the uninitiated (like yours truly), the whole idea of scratching an mp3 on a computer using what's essentially a joystick in the shape of an actual turntable is a little bit baffling. But A-Trak has decades of experience with this sort of thing, so once we were done asking him about what vinyl means to him, and why he doesn't use it in shows any more, we got him to take a step back and explain the basics of how Serato works.

Getting a program like Scratch Live right is like threading a needle:

"[Scratch Live allows] a DJ to continue to play on the physical format that they're used to. There are ways to mix within a computer, but there's an artistry to the craft of playing on vinyl records or even CD turntables that are made to emulate vinyl records. And so DJs want to stick to that equipment but play songs that are actually stored on the computer and that's what Serato allows you to do. You're still using a turntable, you're still using a needle."

Listen to A-Trak demonstrate how Serato's Scratch Live software uses a timecode embedded in a tone on a record to allow him to manipulate a digital version of a song (in this case, his song "Barbra Streisand") stored on his laptop.

The setup is essentially the same as it ever was. Two turntables, a mixer, and speakers. You just add a computer to the chain, and instead of playing directly off the record, the software allows you to assign a digital file to the "record" that's spinning on each turntable. Here's how it works:

"The record that you put on the turntable has a tone rather than having music. But that tone has a time code that a computer can read. The turntable first sends the tone to the computer. On the computer you choose what song you want to assign to each turntable. On the computer you say, 'My left turntable' — which is just a virtual turntable — 'will be playing this Kanye West record.' The computer receives the tone from the record, which says, 'Right now the needle is at 1:32 into the record moving forward.' So the computer produces that music and sends it back to the mixer and then once it hits the mixer it becomes the same as the traditional setup. It goes back to the signal path where the mixer receives music from the turntables and mixes them a certain way.

"Everything that you do on a record is reflected the same way as if it were a real record. If you increase or decrease the pitch on the turntable, which is what you do when you mix records, that information gets transferred as well. The timecode that gets sent to the computer says, 'I'm playing at pitch plus two percent.' And the [computer] gets that information and produces the music accordingly. If you scratch a record, which just means that you're moving a record back and forth, well, you're moving the time code back and forth and that time code gets sent to the computer. And the timecode says, 'On this specific part of the song, the record is going 'Forward, backwards, forward, backwards.' And it goes: 'Chr-prt, chr-prt' and it sounds like a real scratch."

How it changed everything:

"The tiniest reflexes that go through your mind when you're playing a set and thinking of your next songs — these little mini thought process that you're not even conscious of — are completely different when you're looking through a list of titles on a computer compared to physically flicking through records with album covers that tell you what the song is before you even have to read the full name. So there was a process of getting used to DJing and also a process of building up a library of music.

"Part of what made the switch to digital quicker and easier was I did a couple of big file trades with a couple of DJs. You would meet up with another DJ and you had a hard drive with a certain amount of gigs of mp3, and just swap. Then suddenly you're like, 'Whoa, this guy just gave me a folder of like 200 a capellas.' That's a great arsenal. And quickly one thing that became very apparent to me was that right as I started doing a couple of these trades that in a matter of moments would quadruple the size of my song library, I also started accumulating music in a lot of different genres. So if I'm doing a trade with a DJ who knows dancehall really well, and [I say], 'You know what, I don't have a dancehall collection, can you give me your folder of like the essential songs if you're going to do a dancehall set?' And suddenly I had a dancehall set. I had an '80s set. I had a classic soul set. So quickly it became apparent to me that DJing on Serato would allow DJs to jump between different genres a lot more easily."

Still, it took a long time to convince everyone else.

"I was Kanye [West]'s tour DJ for four years, and the entire music of the show rested on my shoulders. It took a while for me to convince his team to let me use Serato because again, everyone was like, 'What if the laptop crashes?' In the earlier days of hip hop, of course, the DJ would play the instrumental track off of vinyl and the rapper would rap on top of it. But sometimes vinyl would skip and it was just kind of part of going to see a rap show. When I was growing up in the '90s I would go to a rap show and there would be a part where the needle skipped. Part of being a live performing rapper was knowing how to still keep rapping when your DJ's needle skips. It's funny when you think about it today. And then at some point in the mid-'90s the first change was DAT machines. A DAT tape deck isn't that big. So there was a point in the mid-'90s where every rap show had a DAT tape deck playing the instrumentals. But they're a pain in the ass to use. You have to rewind and fast forward the tape. It was very slow.

"Here's the weird part, though. Rap shows started using this machine called the Instant Replay, which isn't meant to be used for live music performances at all. The Instant Replay was a machine that was made for radio station IDs. It's a machine that has 50 buttons, and you can record any audio you want and assign it to these various buttons. You hit number twelve and it plays [in radio DJ voice], 'Hey, you're listening to KBBL.'

"I think Cypress Hill was the first band to think of this: rappers went to radio stations and were like, 'What's this machine you're using to trigger all your audio?' And they started using it for live shows. It's also an extremely rugged machine and it was really loud. Rappers like loud sounds. So for all these reasons combined, for years and year every rapper was using this instant replay machine. This big machine with 50 buttons that could trigger all their instrumental tracks. And when I started working with Kanye, his show was on an instant replay machine.

"I hated that machine. Because as a DJ, it gave me no flexibility at all. You couldn't even pause on it and you couldn't start from, you know, the second verse or whatever. All it could do was play something from the beginning, so if we were rehearsing and they'd be like, 'Let's start over from the second chorus,' I'd be like, 'Stupid machine.' But it was extremely reliable. So for that reason everybody felt confident about having that as the backbone of the music on the show. So for the first year I was touring with Kanye, my setup was an Instant Replay on the right with all my instrumental tracks, and then I had one or two turntables and a mixer with Serato which I would just use for scratching and little transitions and effects and things that I would do on top. And I had to negotiate for a long time, like: 'Guys trust me, we can do the whole show on Serato.'

"And eventually, after about a year, we did, and actually it did mess up a few times. But it gave us so much flexibility that everybody was still okay with continuing to use it and as time went along the software itself became more and more reliable and now everybody runs their show off Serato."

Sours: https://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2011/03/04/134259890/dj-a-trak-explains-how-serato-works
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Numark PT01 Scratch - Portable Turntable With DJ Scratch Switch

It’s a new era for DJs! With the PT01 Scratch portable turntable, you can scratch and cut anywhere. Built with Numark’s exclusive Adjustable Scratch Switch™, PT01 Scratch enables you to grab your favorite scratch record (not included) and perform any turntablist scratch routine, whether you have access to AC wall power or you’re outdoors with your friends.

While keeping FRESH with a dope paint job, PT01 Scratch is designed for any DJ that is passionate for the art of turntablism and enjoy digging for vinyl records.

Please see Numark PT01 Scratch Portable Turntable product page for more details.


Serato Performance Series 7" Control Vinyl (Pair, Black)

Due to overwhelming demand from the community, Serato is excited to announce the all-new Performance Series 7" Black Control Vinyl.

The Serato 7" is a long-requested release from our customers, fuelled in part by the hugely popular rise in portable turntablist culture.

This vinyl comes as a pair in Serato's most popular colour, black. Order now while stocks are available.

Please see 7" Control Vinyl for Serato DJ product page for more details.

Sours: https://thedjhookup.com/numark-pt01-scratch-7-serato-vinyl-bundle.html
How to scratch- using the Transform Fx in Serato DJ

Rane Serato Scratch Vinyl Second Edition

Description

The 12" vinyl record has a Serato exclusive and unique control signal which allows Scratch LIVE to track the motion of the record, simulating the same movement with digital audio. This second edition works with software versions 1.2 and higher only. Software may be downloaded from scratchlive.net.
Side A: 10 minutes plus vinyl select area. Side B: 15 minutes
The Second Edition Scratch LIVE colored vinyls are different from the first edition (CV01) in two ways. Firstly, the records are mastered on much better equipment than the original, and do not suffer from any noticeable pitch variation (0.0026% max).
Secondly, the absolute positioning signal (APS) used in these special edition colored vinyls differ from the CV01 enabling the software to distinguish which version of the vinyl is being used, and even which side is playing! The second edition is obvious from the red band on the upper right corner of the sleeve. The label on the vinyl, besides being marked CV02, has large A and B markings to easily tell between the 10:00 and 15:00 sides. Scratch LIVE software version 1.2 and higher is required to use the second edition vinyl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sours: https://www.123dj.com/audio/mp3s/seratovinyl.html

Scratch serato vinyl

Scratch Live

Scratch Live is a vinyl emulation software application created by New Zealand based Serato Audio Research, distributed by and licensed exclusively to Rane Corporation. Serato was first known for its Pro Tools plug-in, Pitch N Time, which was sold predominantly to the film industry.[1]

Scratch Live allows manipulation and playback of digital audio files using traditional vinyl turntables or CD players via special timecode vinyl records or CDs.

The product is discontinued and has been replaced by Serato DJ.

Video-SL[edit]

In 2008, Serato released the first major plugin for Scratch Live, Video-SL. It allows the playback of video files in similar fashion to audio files. Users can apply effects in real time and mix between video independently of audio.

A demo copy can be installed and used but a watermark is displayed on the main output screen. Activation is done via a serial number.

Video-SL was later replaced by a new designed video plugin called "Serato Video".

Custom hardware[edit]

Scratch Live currently works in conjunction with five application specific audio devices designed and manufactured for the system by Mukilteo, Washington-based Rane Corporation.

SL4[edit]

The latest audio interface is the SL4. It is the first standalone DJ interface with two USB 2.0 ports for seamless DJ changeover and back-to-back performances. It also has 96 kHz, 24-bit audio. The SL4 has built in galvanic isolation between USB and audio, with turn on/off muting. The unit also includes Low-latency ASIO and Core Audio drivers which allow the SL4 to be used as a studio production tool with third-party software applications.

SL3[edit]

The SL3 is another audio interface for Scratch Live. Features include a USB 2.0 interface, improved dynamic range (120 dB), improved audio performance (24 bit converters) and additional audio channels with AUX input and output. Like the SL2 it also has 48.0 kHz, 24-bit audio. The extra channel allows the DJ to record his/her music set, use a sampler while performing or connect a third player for three deck mixing.

SL2[edit]

The SL2 is the audio interface set to replace the older SL1 interface.[2] The unit has 2 inputs which can be used both as phono or line input, but unlike the old SL1 interface it doesn't have a microphone input and it has only 2 line outputs and no 'thru' outputs. It also features improvements to the sound quality. Whereas the SL1 interface had 16-bit 44.1 kHz audio, the SL2 now has 24-bit 48khZ audio with USB2.0 and Core Audio/ASIO support.[3]

SL1[edit]

The SL1 is a multi-channel, USB 1.1 external soundcard. The unit has inputs for two stereo turntables or CD players and one unbalanced microphone. There are two stereo line level outputs and two 'thru' outputs which provide a copy of the input signal to enable playback of regular vinyl records or CDs. ASIO drivers are available for the unit to allow it to be used by other Windows applications as a multi channel sound interface. There are no Core Audio drivers for Macintosh-based computers. The SL1 interface is no longer in production, but is still supported.[4]

MP4[edit]

A 19" rack mount DJ mixer based on the MP2, incorporating the sound card functions of the SL1. The MP4 allows you to record your set digitally within the Scratch Live software over the USB interface. The mixer is recognized by Windows as a 4x output 2x input soundcard so it can be used with any windows application. Also provided are ASIO and Core Audio drivers for use in audio applications on both Windows XP and Mac OS X.

TTM 57SL[edit]

A DJ mixer combining the functionality of the SL1 with an application specific control surface based on the popular TTM56 scratch mixer. It also contains added effects not available with the TTM56 or bare SL1 set-ups.

Sixty-Eight[edit]

Announced at NAMM 2010, the Sixty-Eight is a 4 channel club style mixer with 2 separate USB inputs. Via ScratchLive 2.0 it adds support for up 4 real or virtual deck combinations.

Supported third party accessories[edit]

Serato have begun working in supporting third party players/controllers with the Scratch Live software. These controllers are "natively" supported and do not require the use of the timecode CDs, all playback and control information is sent over USB. The following are the currently supported native controllers:

  • Denon DN-HC1000S
  • Denon DN-HC4500
  • Novation Dicer (versions 2.1 and above)
  • Pioneer CDJ-2000 (versions 2.1 and above)
  • Pioneer CDJ-900 (versions 2.1 and above)
  • Pioneer CDJ-850
  • Pioneer CDJ-400
  • Pioneer CDJ-350
  • Pioneer MEP-7000
  • Vestax VFX-1

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratch_Live
What is Digital Vinyl? - Skratch School

Serato DJ vs Serato Scratch Live

Serato Scratch Live

vs

40 facts in comparison

Serato DJ

Serato Scratch Live

Why is Serato DJ better than Serato Scratch Live?

  • Has a reverb effect?
  • Has beat gridding feature?
  • Has a delay/echo effect?
  • Has quantization?
  • Has a flanger effect?
  • Has synchronized samplers?
  • Supports microphones?
  • Has a ping pong delay?

Why is Serato Scratch Live better than Serato DJ?

  • Has reverse play?
  • Can mix videos?
  • Supports vinyl turntables?

Effects

Reverb occurs naturally when a sound is created in an enclosed space, and reflects from the walls. This effect can be created digitally, and is most noticeable when a sound cuts out suddenly and then continues to echo, slowly getting quieter.

The delay/echo sound effect will let you hear your sound rebounded back at you. It’s simply the same sound, repeated again and again.

Flanging is a type of phasing where two signals are introduced milliseconds apart, and then the two signals are mixed together. The delay time is varied, creating a whooshing or jet plane like effect.

This feature gives you the ability to create the classic DJ effect of scratching a vinyl record while playing.

The DJ software lets you repeat certain effects or parts of a song as much as you want. It started with CDJ players, where there was a “loop in” and “loop out” pair of buttons. You had to time precisely when you hit the buttons to get the perfect loop.

Also known as pitch bend, pitch shifting allows you to change the pitch of the music.

The software features a graph that will illustrate the vibration/wave of the track that is currently playing.

Ping Pong delay is one of the most used effects in electronic music. It creates a wide stereo effect, bouncing from left to right. It can be really dramatic and is often used to build up momentum with things like drum crash sounds.

An effect produced by running a signal through an allpass filter, and then combining it with the original signal. This produces a comb filter response, which creates a whirling type sound effect. This is more subtle than a flanging effect, and commonly found in ‘70s rock and jazz.

Audio processing

This feature gives you the ability to switch from one song to the next by lowering the volume of one song and increasing volume of the other.

The Dj software enables you to snap loops or effects to a certain time in the song. This can automatically be set per bar or per beat.

In order to have a smoother transition while mixing, the software can automatically sync the tempo/beat of the two songs.

The software allows you to designate a point in the current song where you want the next song or sound effect to start.

The software can set a number of cue points inside the track automatically.

Time stretching is the process of changing the speed or duration of an audio signal without affecting its pitch.

The DJ software features synchronized samplers with instant record and playback slots. Synchronized samplers let the DJ perform astounding remixes live.

The DJ software can play songs in reverse mode. When activated the track starts going backwards.

The DJ program can automatically adjust the gain volume of two songs so they can better match so that the sound is more agreeable to the listener.

File types

The DJ software supports MP3 audio format. MP3 is the most widespread of the lossy formats. (MP3s at 320kbps are generally accepted as pretty indistinguishable from CD sound quality).

The DJ software supports WAVE (.wav) lossless audio format. These files don’t usually have any room for metadata.

The DJ software supports AAC audio format. It is the native lossy format of Apple’s iTunes, iPod, iPad etc. It usually has the file extension m4a.

The DJ software supports AIFF audio format (lossless format). Be aware that they’re not as universally playable as WAVE files once you get away from Macs.

The DJ software supports FLAC audio format (lossless format). FLAC files are compressed, usually to about half the size of the equivalent WAV.

Features

This feature will find beats in the music so you can assign them to certain sound, effects and songs. Usually a visible grid appears over the track spectrum.

With a mixing history feature, the software automatically saves your audio tracks, enabling you to browse lists of tracks played in past mixing sessions.

The software can automatically detect the key the music is in, allowing you to easily mix tracks with similar keys. This feature could help DJs in choose a suitable song to mix next.

The DJ software supports external microphones hardware and often has a special control section for that.

The DJ software lets you create and save playlists with all your favorite tracks. Playlists can be saved, modified and played over and over.

A high pass filter reduces bass frequencies. This is common in dance music to create a “dropping the bass” sensation when the bass returns.

A low pass filter reduces high frequencies and can be used to create a powerful bass - for example in drum and bass music.

Which are the best DJ software?

Native Instruments Traktor Scratch Pro 2

Native Instruments Traktor Pro 2

Atomix VirtualDJ Pro Full

Show all
This page is currently only available in English.
Sours: https://versus.com/en/serato-dj-vs-serato-scratch-live

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