Denali awd to 2wd

Denali awd to 2wd DEFAULT
2011 GMC Yukon
2011 gmc yukon
2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

FUEL ECONOMY (CITY/HWY)

14 / 18 mpg

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2011 GMC Yukon See more

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

2011 GMC Yukon

25/25 SLIDES

There Are No Expert Reviews For 2011 GMC Yukon. Please Check Back Later.

Sours: https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/gmc/yukon/2011/denali-2wd/sd-AAbLKdk

HIGH-RANGE FOUR WHEEL DRIVE
High-range four-wheel drive, marked as “4↑” on most transfer cases, is designed for use on loose or slippery surfaces. In this setting, the front axle is engaged, and the transfer case then sends power to both the front and rear axles and to all four wheels. 



This mode forces the front and rear axles to spin at the exact same speed. Due to minor tire size differences and track length differences when turning, the front and rear axles can ‘fight’ against each other on high-friction surfaces and results in a condition sometimes known as ‘crow hop’ as tires are forced to slip to the ground.


Since GMC’s transfer cases are designed to be “shifted on the fly,” drivers can shift between high-range two-wheel drive and high-range four-wheel drive without bringing the vehicle to a halt. On electronic transfer cases, an indicator on the selector knob will flash while the shift is being performed and turn solid once it’s fully engaged. For trucks equipped with a manual transfer case, an indicator within the gauge cluster will illuminate.



It’s important to note that high-range four-wheel drive is not intended to be used on dry surfaces or roads with good traction. Doing so may place undue stress on axles, transfer cases, and other drivetrain components which could lead to damage. It’s important to remember to shift out of 4 HI as soon as road conditions improve.



AUTOMATIC 4 HI
If road conditions frequently alternate between high- and low-traction areas, consider using the “AUTO” setting found on select GMC electronic transfer cases. This setting allows your GMC to automatically distribute torque to the front axle by anticipating the need for additional traction.  Shifting into “auto” engages the front axle, but the transfer case sends power primarily to the rear wheels in normal conditions and the clutches modulate torque forward to provide stability and enhance traction to the vehicle.  Although not always optimal for efficiency and wear of your vehicle 4wd driveline, AUTOMATIC 4 HI can be used on any road condition without risk of damaging your vehicle.


LOW-RANGE FOUR WHEEL DRIVE
GMC models equipped with a two-speed transfer case also include a four-wheel drive setting known as “low range.” Typically marked as “4 ↓”, low range effectively doubles the torque sent to the wheels, making it useful for off-road driving in deep sand, mud, or snow. 4WD Low is important for severe off-roading to allow accurate control of vehicle speed over obstacles, and to provide effective engine braking on steep grades to save the brakes from overheating. Low range is meant predominantly for off-road situations, and should not be used at speeds above 45 mph.



Shifting into low-range four-wheel drive is a little more involved than shifting into high-range four-wheel drive.  Drivers will need to shift the transmission into neutral to disconnect torque to allow the transfer case to shift gears.  It is sometimes helpful on Manual Shift Transfer cases to keep the vehicle moving below 3-5 mph while shifting into 4 ↓ to allow the gears to align teeth.  Once the transfer case is in low-range, shift the transmission back into drive. To shift out of low-range back to high range, follow the same procedures. 



It’s important to note that Low-range four-wheel drive is not intended to be used on dry surfaces or roads with good traction. Doing so may place undue stress on axles, transfer cases, and other drivetrain components which could lead to damage. It’s important to remember to shift out of 4 Low as soon as road conditions improve.



For more information on how to use a four-wheel drive transfer case, refer to your GMC’s owner’s manual.

Sours: https://www.gmc.com/gmc-life/how-to/when-to-use-four-wheel-drive
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How It Works: 2WD vs. AWD vs. 4WD

Foul weather, deep snow, and muddy roads can all have drivers craving more traction. There are four distinct drivetrain configurations to choose from: front-wheel, rear-wheel, all-wheel, and four-wheel drive. By learning how each of these systems works, you can better choose the right one for your challenges.

All passenger vehicles sold in the U.S. starting with the 2012 model year come equipped with electronic stability control, which, along with traction control, significantly improves road-holding capabilities, regardless of the drive wheels. Even so, we have found that there are distinct differences in the driving and traction characteristics among drive types. 

If you’re looking for maximum grip, we’ve found that all- and four-wheel-drive systems provide superior traction in some slippery conditions. And don’t forget, tire choice makes a big difference in not only traction for acceleration but also road holding and braking. When it comes time to replace your original tires, be sure to look through the CR ratings to choose a replacement model that performs well in the areas that matter most to you.

As for 2WD vs. AWD vs. 4WD, here’s how the systems work.

The vast majority of passenger vehicles on the road today use front-wheel drive (FWD), where the engine’s power is routed to the front wheels. Front-wheel-drive designs are cheaper to manufacture and more space-efficient than rear-drive systems because the engine, transmission, and axles are located close together in the engine compartment. From an interior packaging standpoint, front-drive precludes the need for a space-robbing transmission and driveshaft hump running down the middle of the cabin floor. Plus, FWD has the added advantage of better traction while climbing hills and driving on slippery surfaces because the engine’s weight is poised over the front wheels. All-wheel drive is often added to FWD-based vehicles and power is sent to the rear wheels only as the need arises. FWD can compromise the sporty performance of a vehicle but strikes a widely desirable balance for everyday driving and usability.

Rear-wheel drive (RWD) is commonly found on full-sized pickups and old-school, truck-based SUVs, along with sports cars and high-performance and luxury sedans. For trucks, RWD allows the use of bulky, heavy-duty axles and suspension components that are designed to handle large loads. On a performance car, rear-wheel drive improves handling by helping to balance the car’s weight more evenly front to rear. And because the front wheels don’t have to do double duty—both driving and steering—designers can optimize the front and rear suspensions for their respective roles. However, RWD provides less traction on slippery roads. These days, most high-end cars offer all-wheel drive either standard or as an option. All body-on-frame pickups and SUVs are offered with optional four-wheel drive.

As the name implies, all-wheel drive (AWD) can feed power to each corner. Depending on the system (designs vary), AWD can provide maximum forward traction during acceleration. It is especially helpful in sloppy road conditions and when driving over moderate off-road terrain. It can help get you going and keep you moving through mud, sand, and other loose surfaces. Most AWD systems deliver power primarily to one set of wheels, front or rear. When slippage is detected at one axle, power is diverted to the other axle, in hopes of finding more traction there. 

Sophisticated clutch systems and, more recently, the use of electric motors allow for precise control over the power sent to each wheel. High-performance vehicles with AWD often send power to each corner at all times but can alter the balance among the wheels depending on conditions or drive mode to change the performance characteristics of the car. 

Not all AWD systems are equal. Subaru’s AWD system always directs at least some of the engine’s power to the rear, and it can direct a larger amount aft if needed. Many other systems fitted to front-wheel-drive vehicles operate with 100 percent of the power normally going to the front wheels; the rear wheels then receive power only when the front wheels start slipping, or proactively based on the vehicle conditions or drive mode selection. This transfer of power is traditionally achieved with a mechanical driveshaft running the length of the car, but electric vehicles and some hybrids utilize individual motors at each axle with no physical connection between them. 

AWD systems are especially helpful in rapidly changing conditions or when driving on a road with intermittent snow and ice. It is commonly used for car-based SUVs, as well as certain cars and minivans.

Although four-wheel drive (4WD) and AWD are designations that are often used interchangeably in advertising and sales literature, there is a difference. Generally, 4WD is optimized for severe off-road driving situations such as climbing over boulders, fording deep water, and tackling steep hills with loose, low-traction surfaces. Most 4WD systems use a heavy-duty transfer case with a high and a low gear range, the latter used to increase torque at the wheels for low-speed climbing. Some have differentials (which allow left and right wheels and front and rear axles to turn at different speeds) that can be locked for maximum traction.

Modern 4WD systems are full-time, which means they stay engaged; automatic, where the vehicle automatically switches between two- and four-wheel-drive mode; or part-time, which requires the driver to manually shift between two- and four-wheel drive. Vehicles with a part-time system shouldn’t be driven on dry pavement when in 4WD mode, which could risk damage to the vehicle’s drivetrain.

Aside from serious off-road enthusiasts, most drivers never come close to needing the capability that 4WD systems provide over and above AWD systems.

For rain and very light snow, 2WD will probably work fine, and for most vehicles, front-wheel drive is the preferred setup and is likely to cost less than an equivalent AWD model. (For performance cars, RWD is preferred, but AWD, if available, can increase traction.) AWD is fine for most normal snow conditions or for light-duty, off-pavement excursions on dirt roads or slippery surfaces. If you’ll be driving in severe snow or true off-road situations, or if you’re interested in pursuing off-roading as a hobby, you should opt for a vehicle with 4WD and lots of ground clearance. Keep in mind that both AWD and 4WD systems add considerable weight to a vehicle, compromising fuel economy.

One of the reasons many people buy a traditional sport-utility vehicle is for the extra security and traction of four-wheel drive. Many drivers don’t realize the limitations of AWD and 4WD, however. Though having power delivered to all four wheels increases straight-line traction, it does nothing to improve braking, and most systems have little to no effect on cornering.

Drivers can be fooled into traveling too quickly in slippery conditions with an AWD or 4WD vehicle, only to discover they are going far too fast when trying to stop. Because the added traction of 4WD can allow a vehicle to accelerate more quickly in slippery conditions, drivers need to be more vigilant, not less. Slippery conditions demand extra caution, no matter what you drive.

In many cases, having good tires is more important than the drive wheels. Winter tires, for instance, actually do help you turn and stop on a snowy road—things that AWD doesn’t help with.


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Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/automotive-technology/2wd-vs-awd-vs-4wd-a5663578720/
Never Buy an All Wheel Drive Car

?2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD: Big, Bold and Powerful?

?2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD Test Drive | Our Auto Expert

Let?s face it, not everyone wants or needs a full-size SUV. In fact, there are a lot of people who hate the very existence of such vehicles, but that?s another matter. For those of you who feel the need for a full-size SUV, or simply appreciate and enjoy the versatility and functionality of such a craft. You probably need to look no further than what GMC has to offer in that category. The 2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD reigns at the top of the pecking order, with a full stable of remaining trim levels.

The GMC full-size lineup consists of the premium Yukon Denali and the Yukon XL Denali, offering accommodations for up to nine passengers, with the space and capability to transport their gear. Second-row power fold-and-tumble seats are available and are class exclusive. Each seat unlatches, folds and tumbles out of the way via an easy one-hand operation, facilitating easier access to the third row seating, which is standard for all Yukon models. All GMC Yukon and Yukon Denali models are available in either 2WD (rear) or 4WD (2WD and AWD for Denali. The extended length Yukon XL also comes in a heavy-duty 2500-series model.

Base Yukon models are built on a 116-inch wheelbase, with an overall length of 202-inches, enabling up to 108.9 cubic feet of storage space, with the second row seat folded and the third row seat removed. Yukon XL models display similar exterior dimensions to regular models, but provide roughly a 14-inch longer wheelbase along with an added 20-nches in length allowing for 137.4 cubic feet of maximum cargo space, with Yukon XL and Yukon XL Denali offering the segments best cargo capacity behind the first, second and third-row seats.

2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD Test Drive | Our Auto Expert

Yukon and Yukon XL models derive their motive force from a 5.3-liter V-8 featuring GM?s fuel-saving Active Fuel Management technology, while Denali models are powered by a 6.2-liter V-8. Both engines are capable of operating on E85 ethanol and feature efficiency enhancing features such as variable valve timing and Active Fuel Management. The Yukon XL 2500 comes with a 6.0-liter V-8 featuring variable valve timing.

The entire Yukon lineup serves up a comfortable and secure driving experience by delivering responsive steering, a wide track and a low center of gravity. All Yukon models are built to tow. In terms of capability, the Yukon 2500 XL leads the pack with a maximum tow rating of 9,600 pounds. Yukon models can tow up to 8,500 pounds, and the Yukon XL is tow-rated at 8,100 pounds. New for 2013 is powertrain grade braking in the normal transmission mode, which was previously incorporated only when the Tow/Haul mode was activated. The new system utilizes engine torque to aid in slowing the vehicle on grade descents, helping to reduce brake wear.

2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD Test Drive | Our Auto Expert

GMC?s Yukon Denali and Yukon XL Denali are readily distinguishable by their chrome honeycomb grille and monochromatic exterior appointment treatment. An acoustical insulation package is an unseen, but exclusive feature contributing to added quietness. Included in the standard fare for Denali models, are 20-inch alloy wheels, a power liftgate, power release second-row fold-and-tumble bucket seats, head curtain and side curtain air bags, power-adjustable pedals, electrochromic (auto-dimming) inside mirror, a remote start system, a rearview camera system and ultrasonic rear parking assist.

The interior provides as standard, Nuance perforated leather seating with heated and cooled first-row seats along with heated second-row captain?s seats, and leather trim throughout. A leather-wrapped, heated steering wheel with power tilt adjustment is standard for all Denali models. Optional features offered include: a power sunroof; power-retractable assist steps and a rear-seat, DVD-based entertainment system. An exclusive interior acoustics package enhances interior quietness, while a Bose Centerpoint 10-speaker surround sound system adds audiophile quality sound.

2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD Test Drive | Our Auto Expert

The Denali model?s 6.2L V-8 is rated at 403 horsepower at 5,700 rpm, while delivering 417 pound feet of torque at 4,300 rpm.

My test 2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali came with a White Diamond Tricoat (metallic) exterior finish, complemented by an Ebony toned interior. The base sticker read $61,860 while the final count and amount rose to $65,390 after adding for the Sun and Entertainment Package with: power sunroof,]; third-row DVD screen; an additional 9 months XM radio and NAV Traffic; and rear-seat entertainment system. The paint finish and destination accounted for balance in total cost.

SUMMARY: Should one happen to need or require more than the 2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD has to offer, perhaps a viable alternative would be something on the order of a rock star?s custom diesel-pusher tour bus, and despite the fact the EPA estimates spending an extra $7,400 more in fuel costs over a five year period when compared to an average new vehicle, 13-mpg city and 18-mpg highway is pretty respectable considering this fully loaded 6,419 pound full-size SUV.

The 6.2-liter V-8 provides plenty of oomph, the transmission shifts smoothly, and the ride quality is quite sumptuous and comfy. The handling characteristics, though not on the same level as a luxury sport sedan, are impressive, responsive and confidence inspiring.

Factor in all of the Yukon XL Denali?s safety features, and one?s confidence and level of security rises even higher. Among the features and equipment are: StabiliTrak electronic stability control system, rear park assist, rearview camera system, Side Blind zone alert, four-wheel ABS, front pretensioner seat belts, standard LATCH child seat attachment system, Tire Pressure Monitoring System and standard remote keyless entry system that provides a second function for the red panic button, allowing drivers to locate their vehicle without sounding the panic alarm. OnStar and OnStar?s Remote Link mobile app allows smartphone users to control various vehicle functions.

2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD Test Drive | Our Auto Expert

In the final analysis, the 2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali may well be the ultimate vehicle for large family treks and adventures in the lap of luxury.

[wptabs style=”wpui-light” effect=”slide” mode=”horizontal”]
?[wptabtitle] SPECIFICATIONS: 2013 GMC Yukon XL Denali AWD [/wptabtitle]
?? [wptabcontent]

Base Price: $61,860.
Price as Tested: $66,385.
Engine Type and Size: : L94 Vortec 6.2-liter OHV, 16-valve Vortec V8 with sequential fuel injection, Active Fuel Management and Flex Fuel capability.
Horsepower (bhp):403 @ 5,700 rpm
Torque (ft./ lbs.):417 @ 4,300 rpm
Transmission: Hydra-Matic 6L90 six-speed automatic.
Drive Train:Longitudinally mounted front engine / All-Wheel Drive.
Suspension: Front – Independent, coil over shock; Autoride real-time damping (opt.)
Rear -Multi-leaf springs.
Brakes: Power-assisted four-wheel disc, four-wheel ABS with hydroboost.
Tires: Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza 275/55 R20 111S M&S mounted on 8-spoke polished aluminum alloy wheels.
Wheelbase:130.0 inches
Length Overall:222.4 inches
Width:79.1 inches
Height:77.1 inches
Curb Weight:6,419 lbs.
Fuel Capacity:39 gallons
EPA Mileage Estimates:13-mpg city / 18-mpg highway
Drag Coefficient:Not listed.
0 – 60 mph: Not tested.

?? [/wptabcontent]
[/wptabs]
 

 

Sours: https://ourautoexpert.com/2013-gmc-yukon-xl-denali-awd-test-drive/

Awd 2wd denali to

 

Vortec 5.3L V-8 FlexFuel (LMG)

Vortec 5.3L V-8 FlexFuel (LC9)

Vortec 6.0L V-8 FlexFuel (L96)

Vortec 6.2L V-8 FlexFuel (L94)

Type:

5.3L V-8

5.3L V-8

6.0L V-8

6.2L V-8

Displacement (cu in / cc):

325 / 5328

325 / 5328

364 / 5967

376 / 6162

Bore & stroke (in / mm):

3.78 x 3.62 / 96 x 92

3.78 x 3.62 / 96 x 92

4.00 x 3.62 / 101.6 x 92

4.06 x 3.62 / 103.25 x 92

Block material:

cast iron

cast aluminum

cast iron

cast aluminum

Cylinder head material:

cast aluminum

cast aluminum

cast aluminum

cast aluminum

Valvetrain:

overhead valve, two valves per cylinder, variable valve timing, Active Fuel Management

overhead valve, two valves per cylinder, variable valve timing, Active Fuel Management

overhead valve, two valves per cylinder, variable valve timing

overhead valve, two valves per cylinder, variable valve timing Active Fuel Management

Ignition system:

coil-near-plug ignition, iridium electrode tip/ iridium core spark plugs, low resistance spark plug wires

coil-near-plug ignition, iridium electrode tip/ iridium core spark plugs, low resistance spark plug wires

coil-near-plug ignition, iridium electrode tip/ iridium core spark plugs, low resistance spark plug wires

coil-near-plug ignition, iridium electrode tip/ iridium core spark plugs, low resistance spark plug wires

Fuel delivery:

sequential fuel injection

sequential fuel injection

sequential fuel injection

sequential fuel injection

Compression ratio:

9.9:1

9.9:1

9.6:1

10.4:1

Horsepower (hp / kW @ rpm):

320 / 239 @ 5400* (gas – Yukon and Yukon XL)

326 / 243 @ 5300* (E85 – Yukon and Yukon XL)

320 / 239 @ 5400* (gas –Yukon XL)

326 / 243 @ 5300* (E85 –Yukon XL)

352 / 262 @ 5400*

403 / 301 @ 5700*

Torque (lb-ft / Nm @ rpm):

335 / 454 @ 4000* (gas)

348 / 472 @ 4400* (E85)

335 / 454 @ 4000* (gas)

348 / 472 @ 4400* (E85)

382 / 518 @ 4200*

417 / 565 @ 4300*

Fuel:

regular unleaded or E85

regular unleaded or E85

regular unleaded

premium recommended, but not required; or E85

Maximum engine speed (rpm):

6000

6000

6000

6000

Emissions controls:

close-coupled catalytic converter, 58X ignition, returnless fuel rail, fast-response O² sensor

close-coupled catalytic converter, 58X ignition, returnless fuel rail, fast-response O² sensor

close-coupled catalytic converter, 58X ignition, returnless fuel rail, fast-response O²

sensor

close-coupled catalytic converter, 58X ignition, returnless fuel rail, fast-response O² sensor

EPA estimated fuel economy (city / hwy):

Yukon 2WD: 15 / 21 (gas)

Yukon 4WD: 15 / 21 (gas)

Yukon XL 2WD: 15 / 21 (gas)

Yukon XL 4WD: 15 / 21 (gas)

 

Yukon XL 2500 2WD: 10 / 16 (gas)

Yukon XL 2500 4WD: 10 / 15 (gas)

Yukon Denali and Yukon XL Denali 2WD: 14 / 18 (gas)

Yukon Denali and Yukon XL Denali 4WD: 13 / 18 (gas)

Sours: https://www.gminnovates.ca/media/ca/en/gmc/vehicles/yukon/2013.tab1.html
Nitrous 6.0 Escalade How to convert Awd to 2wd phase 3

Denali All-wheel Drive
2012 GMC Yukon Equipment

Warranty
Warranty - Basic (mths/miles)36/36,000
Warrranty - Powertrain (mths/miles)60/100,000
Warranty - Corrosion perforation (mths/miles)72/100,000
Warranty - Roadside assistance (mths/miles)60/100,000
Mechanical
Engine6.2L V-8
Engine - valvetrainOHV
Recommended fuelflexible
Brakes4-wheel disc
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)4-wheel
Drive typeall wheel
4WD shiftN/A
Engine block heateropt
Exhauststainless steel
Steeringrack and pinion
Suspension tuningtouring
Ride controlAutoride
Automatic level controlrear
Front suspension typeshort and long arm
Front anti-roll barstd
Front shockspremium
Front springscoil
Rear suspension typemulti-link
Rear anti-roll barstd
Rear shocksair
Rear springscoil
Electronic stability systemStabiliTrak w/Proactive Roll Avoidance
Sequential shift controlstd
Transmission6-spd auto w/OD
Axle ratio3.42
Locking/limited slip differentialstd
Remote vehicle starting systemstd
Traction controlABS and driveline
Interior
Driver information centerstd
Tachometerstd
Trip computerstd
Water temp gaugestd
Voltage gaugestd
Low fuel warningstd
Service interval warningstd
Lighting - map lightsfront and rear
Lighting - dome lightfade
Lighting - cargo lightstd
Illuminated vanity mirrorsdriver and passenger
Rear window defoggerstd
Rear view mirrorauto-dimming day-night
Mirrors - visor vanity mirrorsdriver and passenger
Seatback storage pockets2
Tilt-Wheel adjustable steering columnstd
Steering wheel materialleather/simulated wood
Air conditioning, frontdual zone automatic
Air conditioning, rearwith separate controls
Underseat ductsstd
Cargo concealed storagestd
Cargo netopt
Cargo tie downsstd
Clockin-radio display
Cupholdersfront and rear
Gear shift knob trimleather
Overhead consolemini
Floor consolefull
Floor matscarpeted front and rear
Instrumentationanalog
Oil pressure gaugestd
Airbags, frontaldriver and front passenger
Airbags, side impactseat mounted, driver and passenger
Airbags, side curtaincurtain 1st, 2nd and 3rd row
Height adjustable safety beltsfront
Seatbelt pre-tensionersfront
Exterior
Exterior light controlfully automatic
Antennawindow grid
Body materialfully galvanized steel
Paintclearcoat monotone
Bodyside moldingsbody-colored
Bodyside insertchrome
Grille trimchrome
Fog/driving lightsfront
Door count4 doors
Rear cargo doorpower liftgate
Tinted windowsdeep
Rear window typeflip-up
Mirrorsdual power remote w/tilt down
Heated door mirrorsstd
Mirrors, auto dimmingdriver
Sunroof1st row regular express open/close sliding and tilting glass
Spoilerlip
Roof rackstd
Rear step bumperstd
TiresP275/55SR20.0 BSW AS
Wheels20" chrome aluminum
Spare tire and wheelfull-size steel
Windshield wipers - frontvariable intermittent
Rear window wipersfixed interval
Running boardsstd
Headlightshalogen
Delay off headlampsstd
Daytime running lightsstd
Convenience
Exterior temperature displaystd
Compassstd
Cruise controlstd
12V DC power outlet5
Front windowspower
Rear windowspower
1-touch window downdriver
Programmable garage door openerstd
Remote trunk releasepower
Retained accessory powerstd
Adjustable pedalspower
Occupancy sensorstd
In-Vehicle Assistance ServiceOnStar Directions & Connections
Automatic Crash Response (airbags and/or sensors)OnStar Directions & Connections
Emergency ServicesOnStar Directions & Connections
Crisis AssistOnStar Directions & Connections
Stolen Vehicle AssistanceOnStar Directions & Connections
Remote Door UnlockOnStar Directions & Connections
Roadside AssistanceOnStar Directions & Connections
Remote Horn and LightsOnStar Directions & Connections
Turn-by-Turn NavigationOnStar Directions & Connections
Hands-Free CallingOnStar Directions & Connections
Vehicle DiagnosticsOnStar Directions & Connections
Stolen-vehicle trackingstd
Illuminated entrystd
Parking assistUltraSonic
Remote keyless entrykeyfob (all doors)
Panic alarmstd
Door lockspower with 2 stage unlock
Content theft deterrent alarm systemstd
Ignition disablePasskey III
Theft deterrent radiostd
Blind spot sensorstd
Low tire pressure warningstd
Entertainment
RadioSiriusXM AM/FM/Satellite, seek-scan
CD playerin-dash mounted single
MP3 capabilitystd
Auxiliary input jackstd
DVD-Audiostd
Steering wheel audio controlsstd
Rear seat audio controlsstd
Speakers10 Bose
Amplifierstd
Equalizerautomatic
Speed sensitive Volumestd
Entertainment systemwith DVD
Navigation systemyes with voice activation
1st row LCD screen1
2nd row LCD screen1
Bluetooth Compatibilitystd
Comfort
Front seat typebucket
Standard seating7 passengers
Front driver seat direction controls8-way power
Front passenger seat direction controls8-way power
Lumbar supportdriver and passenger
Front armrestscenter
Front head restraintsadjustable w/tilt
Heated front seatsdriver and front passenger heated-cushion, heated-seatback
Cooled front seatsdriver and passenger
Memorydriver
Rear seatsbucket
Rear armrestopt
Rear head restraints2 - adjustable
Heated rear seatsstd
3rd row seats50-50 split-bench
Seat trimleather
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RE:

Postby 97k15004wd »

Data from Alldata:

DEFINITIONS

AWD vs. 4WD

The very basic difference between AWD and 4WD is the intended usage of the systems.

AWD is usually intended for on-road use in inclement weather conditions, while operating smoothly on dry pavement by allowing for a difference in speed between the front and rear axles while turning. These systems are not selectable and do not have low range gearing for the transfer case. These systems can be found in cars or trucks.

4WD is primarily found in trucks and can be broken down into Part-Time, Full-Time, and Automatic Transfer Cases. These selectable systems have modes intended for on-road use and other modes intended for off-road or low traction situation usage. All current GM 4WD systems have a low range available in the transfer case.

CHARACTERISTICS

Disclaimer: Even though a certain amount of noise or feel can be expected, GM may offer service procedures or components, or change vehicle design, which may reduce perceived noise levels in the interest of customer satisfaction.

AWD

There are two different categories of AWD systems. The first category is full-time AWD. This type of transfer case delivers torque to the front and rear axles at all times. This ratio can vary depending on the system, but is usually about a 30/70% front to rear split but also can vary depending on traction conditions, up to 100% front or rear. This type of transfer case can have a viscous coupling for low traction conditions along with a planetary gear set to allow for difference in speeds between the front and rear axle, or an open type of planetary gear set differential, which uses brake based traction control for low traction conditions. An example of a vehicle with an open differential/traction control type of transfer case is a 2003 Escalade. RPO codes for these types of transfer cases are NP3 (NVG 149, BW 4473 viscous clutch) and NR3 (BW 4476, 4481, 4485, open differential) or NR4/NR6 (BW 4493, 4494 open differential).

The second category is an on-demand AWD. This type of AWD basically delivers torque only to a primary driving axle unless reduced traction is experienced. At that point, the system electronically or mechanically will apply torque to the other axle. Depending on the type of system, this can provide up to 100% of the torque to the axle with traction. These transfer cases use an electronically actuated clutch pack, a hydraulically actuated clutch pack, or a viscous coupling to allow for a difference in speed between the front and rear axles. An example of an electronically controlled version of the On-Demand AWD is in the Smart Trak system in the 2003 Bravada. An example of a hydraulically operated On-Demand AWD is the Versa Trak system in the Aztek, while a viscous coupling is used in the Vibe. The RPO code for the Bravada is NP4 (NVG126). For some vehicle lines, there is not an RPO code. The only way to tell is by the Line Chassis VIN code, B for the Rendezvous/Aztek, V for the Venture/Montana or by SM for the Vibe.

PART-TIME 4WD

Part time 4WD refers to vehicles equipped with a transfer case to split power between the front and rear axles of the vehicle. This traditionally is a 2-speed selectable transfer case that can be shifted into 2H1, 4H1, 4L0 and usually a Neutral position. The 4WD modes of Part time systems do not allow for a difference in speed between the front and rear axles while turning. This system effectively locks the front and rear propeller shafts together. When turning, the tires must allow for the different turning radius of the front and rear axles, which is why this is intended for low traction or off-road use. These systems have low range gearing for the transfer case. An example of a vehicle with this style of transfer case would be a Silverado with a manual shift transfer case (a shift lever on the floor) (RPO NP2) or a Colorado with a push button transfer case with a 2H1, 4H1, 4L0 and Neutral position (RPO NP1). The RPO codes for this style of transfer case are NP1 (NVG 233, 243, 263, and T-150 push button) or NP2 (NVG 231, 241, 261, BW 4401, 4470 shift lever).

FULL-TIME 4WD

A second version of a 4WD transfer case is a full-time 4WD transfer case. This style of transfer case has an open center differential to allow for different speeds between the front and rear axles and operates similar to an AWD system. This transfer case can be locked to operate like a Part-Time 4WD transfer case (no difference between front and rear prop-shaft speeds) and/or uses a traction control system to assist in low traction situations. These transfer cases also have a selectable low range. An example of this type of 4WD is the H2. RPO code is NR4.

The NR4 transfer case (available in non-luxury utilities) has no switch selection to lock into a part4ime 4WD mode as described above. There are only 3 selections on the controls: Disable Stabilitrak, AWD and 4L0. The Owner's Manual describes this system as an AWD system.

AUTOMATIC TRANSFER CASES

The last category is a combination of 4WD and On Demand AWD. These transfer cases have a 2H1, Auto-4WD, 4H1, 4L0 and Neutral position and would fall in the general 4WD category. This transfer case has the operating characteristics of both an On Demand AWD and a Part-Time 4WD system depending on the mode selected. This transfer case uses a clutch pack to allow for a difference in speed between the front and rear axles in the Auto-4WD mode. In the 4H1 or 4L0 modes, there is no allowance for the difference in speed between the front and rear axles. An example of a vehicle with this would be a Sierra with a push-button transfer case with a 2H1, Auto-4WD, 4H1, 4L0, and Neutral positions. The RPO code for these transfer cases is NP8 (NVG 226, 236, 246, 246 EAU).

Fred

Sours: https://www.ppediesel.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5569


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